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The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
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March 29, 1990     The Sundance Times
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March 29, 1990
 

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Ninety Second Year No. 13 March 29, 1990 Official Newspalr for Cr@elt Ceunty, City of SurKlen |M U. S. Lan@ Office HE UNDANCIE Cntinuing The Crook County News IN THE BLACK HILLS OF WYOMING IMIES THIRTY-FIVE CENTSpER COPY economic seminar Sur, dance Economic !lPment Committee said [Week it will sponsor a .ar April 17 and 18 on cating Community Volun- m Economic Develop- e COurse will be taught by a ssional economic develop- Staff from Basin Electric, arck, N.D. e seminar will be held in 'OUrthouse basement and Oaarnittee said it is urging Ple who would be willing lp to attend tt:e seminar earn more about what must )lie. in April on economic development: Large cities with large bud- gets often have full-tin:e pro- fessional employees who do "economic development", but for communities the size of Sun- dance, the work must be done by volunteers, by people willing to do their part to help their communities survive. If we do nothing, we will continue to see jobs and money flowing to near- by, larger towns. As this happens, all the services we need as people living in a town, will become more expensive for each os us. As businesses close and tion, schools, law enforcement, and utilities will go up. There- fore, something must be done to try to encourage new busi- nesses to start up here and the businesses we have, to do more business because there is no money to hire someone to do this job for us, we must do it ourselves, on our own time and expense. The course being offered will help us learn to help ourselves, the group said. It wi]l present the mechanice of the economic development process and how that process can change a com- munity, it will review strategies !o e information is avail- rnDale, 283-3531;Gene, buildings are empty, property that have worked for other values will go down, and the towns our size, and it will teach 92; or Ernie, 283-3756. cost to each of us remaining us what the realistic expecta- group outlined its views here for streets, garbage collec- tions for success are.. ndance will host t00creation commission  Keck, Interim Director Wyoming Recreation [j'Ssion, has announced WEATHER l e next quarterly meeting Wyoming Recreation Ssion commissioners will d Friday, April 6, at the County y:mUtnhg?UseThm ce, Wy [g will begin at 8:00 a.m. [. Open to the public. I r agenda items will in- ]aendment to State Park Rules & Regulations * Land & Water Conservation Fund allocations * presentation by the Friends of South Pass City of a proposal for a concession at South Pass City * update of legislation passed at recent Wyoming State Legis- lative session R.D. "Max" Maxfield, Dir- ector of the Wyoming Depart- ment of Commerce, will also be present to discuss the Depart- ment of Commerce reorgani- zation. The readings: Max. Min. Prec. March 20 64 32 0 March 2t 53 22 .01 March 22 26 11 .13 March 23 12 4 .08 March 24 21 -3 .08 March 25 40 8 0 March 26 47 18 0 March 27 46 24 0 Did You Know That: i The 1890 Legislature made it a misdemeanor crime to drive or ride over a county bridge faster than a walk? Thomas Edison was camping in the the Medicine Bow Mountains when he got his ideaforthe electric light? In the early 1880's, a black man named R. M. Ford ran the Ford House in Cheyenne and was completing the building plans for a fine, modern, three story structure which was to be called the inter- Ocean Hotel? Tax fund money is distributed Tax funds based on January cigarette taxes and February sales tax collections have been distributed to cities, towns and counties in the state by the Dept. of Revenue. Distribution for this area were: Sales tax: Sundance - $11,964.62; Moorcroft $11,158.39; Hulett - $3,201.45; Pine Haven $893.82; and Crook county - $31,202.72. Cigarette tax: Sundance $1,036.21; Moorcroft-$1,066.05; Hulett - $439.12; Pine Haven - $5.90; and Crook county $820.43. ast beef was delicious and so was every- Picture above shows some of the enthusiastic se Tuesday as the Crook County Cattle- food lovers who attended the luncheon served in held a buffet luncheon in appreciation of the community room in the courthouse basement. Port of their associate members. Photo by Howard Allen Items shown here were collected recently in a canned food drive contest in the county's high schools. The event was co-sponsored by Y100 Radio in Gillette and the Crook County Council of County Services. Looking at some of the food items collected are [left to right] Dixie Gudmonson, assistant director, Crook County Family Violence; June Scribner, director of Family Violence and Sexual Assault Services; Pastor Dean Scott, Hulett; and Pastor Paul Redfield, Sundance. Scribner, Scott and Redfield are all members of the council. According to the council's food drive coordi- nator Janet Engel, Sundance, over 1200 items were donated with the Hulett school collecting 826 items to win the contest. A food pantry to benefit transients and needy locals has been established in each town - the Family Violence office in Sundance; First South- ern Baptist Church in Moorcroft and the medical clinic in Hulett. Requests for food can be made to the above pictured council members, all law enforcement personnel or pastors in each town and the Crook County D-PASS office in Sundance. Photo by Howard Allen Jackson rancher Mary Mead has announced that she will be a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor of Wyoming. Mrs. Mead, 54, is the daughter of former U.S. Senator and Mrs. Cliff Hansen, Jackson. In announcing her candidacy, she cited the need for "bold, aggressive leadership in state government." Mrs. Mead sounded a call for change in the leadership of state government, stating, "We have low taxes and a good environ- ment. We spend 80 percent of our tax dollars on education. Most of all, we are a tough, resilent people. It's time for a 'user-friendly state government' for the people of Wyoming and businesses considering coming here." A graduate of the University of Wyoming, Mead taught school in Pinedale and is the former president of the Wyoming Heritage Society and Foundation. She also served as an officer of the Wyoming Stockgrowers Assn. NEW Respite Care meeting planned Northeast Wyoming Respite Care, Gillette, which has ex- pressed interest in expanding respite care services into Crook county, will hold an informa- tional meeting at the Aro Restaurant in Sundance Thurs- day starting at 3 p.m. Respite care enable families to take a break from the daily responsibilities involved in the care of handicapped persons, maintain family stability and well-being, preserve the family unit and prevent institutionali- zation and abuse of the handi- profit group created in 1981 to provide short-term relief care to mentally and physically handi- capped individuals. Duplicate A three-table Howell move- ment was played March 20 during the weekly meeting of the Sundance Duplicate Bridge Club. Results of the play were: 1. Marjorie Goodson and Lorin Harper; 2. Floyd Carr and Bob capped person. GEtF turns down Dorrance request Wheat program deadline April 13 Wheat producers were re- minded this week that the dead- line for participating in the 1990 wheat and feed grain program is April 13. Minnie Williams, executive director of the Crook County ASCS, said that this year there is an option so that no set-aside is required. More information on the 1990 program is available by calling Beaudoin; and 3. Claudis Carr the county ASCS office at 283-  NEW Respite Care is a non- and Mildred Durfee. 2870. animously to deny them. ooi board approves salaries, offers staff contracts iistrative and profes- staff salaries were m |(1 and contracts offered itessiOnal staff members changed the February board minutes to read that the board did not intend to issue a con- tract to Joe Gibson, former Moorcroft secondary principal who took a leave of absence last year. Early retirement requests were approved for Robert Beau- don, Jeanne Threet, Terry King, James Henman and Richard Castello. However, the board rejected Gregory Gorman's request for early retirement . and requests for early retirement in 1991-92 sub- mitted by Elva Castello and Richard Castello. The board ;e. 1990-91 school year [a he meeting of the Crook [ihool District No. One F Sundance Thursday  ,, ard also adopted salary es for all other school lel calling for an appro- 3% Pay increase. Ssional staff salaries will e on the average about ethte salary -e for 1990-91 has a base (up $500) with a vertical increment of $600 (up $25) and horizontal increments ranging from $1000 to $1300. Individual administrative schedules approved by the board for 1990-91 were: Supt. Ott Wegner, up $1650 to $56,850; Jeffery Carrier, Hulett secondary principal, $43,000; Mark Mayer, Hulett elementary principal, $41,000; John Block, Moorcroft second- ary principal, $41,000; John Hargrove, Sundance secondary principal, $41,000; Robert Campbell, Sundance elemen- tary principal, $41,000; Larry Coleman, maintenance super- visor, $25,760 plus overtime; and community ed coordinators Rita McKenney and Lynelle Konantz, $6500; and Margaret Hall, $9100. During the meeting, Marc McClanahan, director of curri- culum/special education, sub- mitted his resignation effective at the end of the current school year. Also submitting a resignation was Hulett teacher Laura Nor- ton. She will not be able to teach after April 6 but will finish her contract with sick leave. The board also accepted the resignation of Joe Gibson and Meeting in Jackson Monday, the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission rejected Devils Tower rancher John Dorrauce's request to import native and exotic game animals for a game ranch. Dorrance had sought to gain approval to import 15 exotic species including arctic wolves, ibex and Europem boar plus four native species Dorrence told the commission he though his proposal was economically sound. Following two hours of testi- mony, the commission divided Dorrance's request into three parts and then voted un- said the requests did not comply' with the policy. Six persons were on hand for the open forum held in advance of the board meeting. Coming up for discussion were: 1. A proposal for a curriculum change at Sundance High School concerning driver edu- cation which is taught in the summer instead of during the regular school day. It was felt this is detrimental to students living in the country and that costs are high for parents to provide driver education and other extra-curricular activities for students living : the country. 2. The feeling was expressed that the Joe Gibson situation was not handled properly and that the situation should have been handled before his leave of absence was granted not after- ward. Concern was expressed as to what the board might do with other leaves of absence. 3. Discussed was the issue of early retirement and the ques- tion was asked for the reason behind its discontinuance. Board members said they felt financial considerations were responsible for the change. .\\; 4. Concern was expressed over the direction education is taking. Noted were the strong emphasis on sports as com- pared to fine arts courses. Patrons said the art program in Sundance was lacking and does not have enough upper level and "has no fire." It was noted that speech used to be required and is needed because students are coming up short in these areas; a large number of ele- mentary students are interested in drama so what happens? Following is the list of pro- fessional staff members offered [Cont. on Page 2] Ninety Second Year No. 13 March 29, 1990 Official Newspalr for Cr@elt Ceunty, City of SurKlen |M U. S. Lan@ Office HE UNDANCIE Cntinuing The Crook County News IN THE BLACK HILLS OF WYOMING IMIES THIRTY-FIVE CENTSpER COPY economic seminar Sur, dance Economic !lPment Committee said [Week it will sponsor a .ar April 17 and 18 on cating Community Volun- m Economic Develop- e COurse will be taught by a ssional economic develop- Staff from Basin Electric, arck, N.D. e seminar will be held in 'OUrthouse basement and Oaarnittee said it is urging Ple who would be willing lp to attend tt:e seminar earn more about what must )lie. in April on economic development: Large cities with large bud- gets often have full-tin:e pro- fessional employees who do "economic development", but for communities the size of Sun- dance, the work must be done by volunteers, by people willing to do their part to help their communities survive. If we do nothing, we will continue to see jobs and money flowing to near- by, larger towns. As this happens, all the services we need as people living in a town, will become more expensive for each os us. As businesses close and tion, schools, law enforcement, and utilities will go up. There- fore, something must be done to try to encourage new busi- nesses to start up here and the businesses we have, to do more business because there is no money to hire someone to do this job for us, we must do it ourselves, on our own time and expense. The course being offered will help us learn to help ourselves, the group said. It wi]l present the mechanice of the economic development process and how that process can change a com- munity, it will review strategies !o e information is avail- rnDale, 283-3531;Gene, buildings are empty, property that have worked for other values will go down, and the towns our size, and it will teach 92; or Ernie, 283-3756. cost to each of us remaining us what the realistic expecta- group outlined its views here for streets, garbage collec- tions for success are.. ndance will host t00creation commission  Keck, Interim Director Wyoming Recreation [j'Ssion, has announced WEATHER l e next quarterly meeting Wyoming Recreation Ssion commissioners will d Friday, April 6, at the County y:mUtnhg?UseThm ce, Wy [g will begin at 8:00 a.m. [. Open to the public. I r agenda items will in- ]aendment to State Park Rules & Regulations * Land & Water Conservation Fund allocations * presentation by the Friends of South Pass City of a proposal for a concession at South Pass City * update of legislation passed at recent Wyoming State Legis- lative session R.D. "Max" Maxfield, Dir- ector of the Wyoming Depart- ment of Commerce, will also be present to discuss the Depart- ment of Commerce reorgani- zation. The readings: Max. Min. Prec. March 20 64 32 0 March 2t 53 22 .01 March 22 26 11 .13 March 23 12 4 .08 March 24 21 -3 .08 March 25 40 8 0 March 26 47 18 0 March 27 46 24 0 Did You Know That: i The 1890 Legislature made it a misdemeanor crime to drive or ride over a county bridge faster than a walk? Thomas Edison was camping in the the Medicine Bow Mountains when he got his ideaforthe electric light? In the early 1880's, a black man named R. M. Ford ran the Ford House in Cheyenne and was completing the building plans for a fine, modern, three story structure which was to be called the inter- Ocean Hotel? Tax fund money is distributed Tax funds based on January cigarette taxes and February sales tax collections have been distributed to cities, towns and counties in the state by the Dept. of Revenue. Distribution for this area were: Sales tax: Sundance - $11,964.62; Moorcroft $11,158.39; Hulett - $3,201.45; Pine Haven $893.82; and Crook county - $31,202.72. Cigarette tax: Sundance $1,036.21; Moorcroft-$1,066.05; Hulett - $439.12; Pine Haven - $5.90; and Crook county $820.43. ast beef was delicious and so was every- Picture above shows some of the enthusiastic se Tuesday as the Crook County Cattle- food lovers who attended the luncheon served in held a buffet luncheon in appreciation of the community room in the courthouse basement. Port of their associate members. Photo by Howard Allen Items shown here were collected recently in a canned food drive contest in the county's high schools. The event was co-sponsored by Y100 Radio in Gillette and the Crook County Council of County Services. Looking at some of the food items collected are [left to right] Dixie Gudmonson, assistant director, Crook County Family Violence; June Scribner, director of Family Violence and Sexual Assault Services; Pastor Dean Scott, Hulett; and Pastor Paul Redfield, Sundance. Scribner, Scott and Redfield are all members of the council. According to the council's food drive coordi- nator Janet Engel, Sundance, over 1200 items were donated with the Hulett school collecting 826 items to win the contest. A food pantry to benefit transients and needy locals has been established in each town - the Family Violence office in Sundance; First South- ern Baptist Church in Moorcroft and the medical clinic in Hulett. Requests for food can be made to the above pictured council members, all law enforcement personnel or pastors in each town and the Crook County D-PASS office in Sundance. Photo by Howard Allen Jackson rancher Mary Mead has announced that she will be a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor of Wyoming. Mrs. Mead, 54, is the daughter of former U.S. Senator and Mrs. Cliff Hansen, Jackson. In announcing her candidacy, she cited the need for "bold, aggressive leadership in state government." Mrs. Mead sounded a call for change in the leadership of state government, stating, "We have low taxes and a good environ- ment. We spend 80 percent of our tax dollars on education. Most of all, we are a tough, resilent people. It's time for a 'user-friendly state government' for the people of Wyoming and businesses considering coming here." A graduate of the University of Wyoming, Mead taught school in Pinedale and is the former president of the Wyoming Heritage Society and Foundation. She also served as an officer of the Wyoming Stockgrowers Assn. NEW Respite Care meeting planned Northeast Wyoming Respite Care, Gillette, which has ex- pressed interest in expanding respite care services into Crook county, will hold an informa- tional meeting at the Aro Restaurant in Sundance Thurs- day starting at 3 p.m. Respite care enable families to take a break from the daily responsibilities involved in the care of handicapped persons, maintain family stability and well-being, preserve the family unit and prevent institutionali- zation and abuse of the handi- profit group created in 1981 to provide short-term relief care to mentally and physically handi- capped individuals. Duplicate A three-table Howell move- ment was played March 20 during the weekly meeting of the Sundance Duplicate Bridge Club. Results of the play were: 1. Marjorie Goodson and Lorin Harper; 2. Floyd Carr and Bob capped person. GEtF turns down Dorrance request Wheat program deadline April 13 Wheat producers were re- minded this week that the dead- line for participating in the 1990 wheat and feed grain program is April 13. Minnie Williams, executive director of the Crook County ASCS, said that this year there is an option so that no set-aside is required. More information on the 1990 program is available by calling Beaudoin; and 3. Claudis Carr the county ASCS office at 283-  NEW Respite Care is a non- and Mildred Durfee. 2870. animously to deny them. ooi board approves salaries, offers staff contracts iistrative and profes- staff salaries were m |(1 and contracts offered itessiOnal staff members changed the February board minutes to read that the board did not intend to issue a con- tract to Joe Gibson, former Moorcroft secondary principal who took a leave of absence last year. Early retirement requests were approved for Robert Beau- don, Jeanne Threet, Terry King, James Henman and Richard Castello. However, the board rejected Gregory Gorman's request for early retirement . and requests for early retirement in 1991-92 sub- mitted by Elva Castello and Richard Castello. The board ;e. 1990-91 school year [a he meeting of the Crook [ihool District No. One F Sundance Thursday  ,, ard also adopted salary es for all other school lel calling for an appro- 3% Pay increase. Ssional staff salaries will e on the average about ethte salary -e for 1990-91 has a base (up $500) with a vertical increment of $600 (up $25) and horizontal increments ranging from $1000 to $1300. Individual administrative schedules approved by the board for 1990-91 were: Supt. Ott Wegner, up $1650 to $56,850; Jeffery Carrier, Hulett secondary principal, $43,000; Mark Mayer, Hulett elementary principal, $41,000; John Block, Moorcroft second- ary principal, $41,000; John Hargrove, Sundance secondary principal, $41,000; Robert Campbell, Sundance elemen- tary principal, $41,000; Larry Coleman, maintenance super- visor, $25,760 plus overtime; and community ed coordinators Rita McKenney and Lynelle Konantz, $6500; and Margaret Hall, $9100. During the meeting, Marc McClanahan, director of curri- culum/special education, sub- mitted his resignation effective at the end of the current school year. Also submitting a resignation was Hulett teacher Laura Nor- ton. She will not be able to teach after April 6 but will finish her contract with sick leave. The board also accepted the resignation of Joe Gibson and Meeting in Jackson Monday, the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission rejected Devils Tower rancher John Dorrauce's request to import native and exotic game animals for a game ranch. Dorrance had sought to gain approval to import 15 exotic species including arctic wolves, ibex and Europem boar plus four native species Dorrence told the commission he though his proposal was economically sound. Following two hours of testi- mony, the commission divided Dorrance's request into three parts and then voted un- said the requests did not comply' with the policy. Six persons were on hand for the open forum held in advance of the board meeting. Coming up for discussion were: 1. A proposal for a curriculum change at Sundance High School concerning driver edu- cation which is taught in the summer instead of during the regular school day. It was felt this is detrimental to students living in the country and that costs are high for parents to provide driver education and other extra-curricular activities for students living : the country. 2. The feeling was expressed that the Joe Gibson situation was not handled properly and that the situation should have been handled before his leave of absence was granted not after- ward. Concern was expressed as to what the board might do with other leaves of absence. 3. Discussed was the issue of early retirement and the ques- tion was asked for the reason behind its discontinuance. Board members said they felt financial considerations were responsible for the change. .\\; 4. Concern was expressed over the direction education is taking. Noted were the strong emphasis on sports as com- pared to fine arts courses. Patrons said the art program in Sundance was lacking and does not have enough upper level and "has no fire." It was noted that speech used to be required and is needed because students are coming up short in these areas; a large number of ele- mentary students are interested in drama so what happens? Following is the list of pro- fessional staff members offered [Cont. on Page 2]