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The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
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April 21, 1955     The Sundance Times
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April 21, 1955
 

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County Fairl Informal Talks End Meeting Board Plans 1955 work The Crook County Fair Board, meeting April 16 in Sundance, said it would accept contributions to be used to purchase materials to re- pair the fair buildings in Sundance. Other organizations in the coun- ty have appointed representatives to a fair building repair committee which will outline ways to raise money to repair the buildings. During the session, the board also worked on the 1955 budget. However, Willet Keyser said the budget had not yet been completed. The 1955 county fair also came in for discussion during last week's meeting. Scotty Gladstone and Harold Bernd, appearing for the Sundance American Legion and VFW posts, discussed entertain- ment plans for the fair. Keyser said it appeared that a carnival would be obtained for the fair. A county talent show will also round out the program. Vocational agriculture teachers p from the county's three high schools also attended the session and submitted their proposed bud- get for FFA premiums at the fair. --Bridge (Continued from First Page) However, the Tregos were near- ly nipped at the wire when Mr. and Mrs. Jay Durfee posted a re- sounding 6280 score, the highest of the tournament, to take second place money of $12 and fall only 235 points short of sneaking off with first place honors. In third position were Ports who won the $8 third prize. Rounding out the top ten were Gladstones, A. B. Durfees, Robertses, Lindseys, Binneys, Carrs and the team of Harriet Baldwin and Bernice Will- iams. FoIlowing completion of the tournament, it was revealed that 13 couples had already signed to enter next year's marathon. Other couples interested in joining may sign up by calling either Bernice William or Charlotte Lindsey. The PTA also expressed its thanks to persons who brought tables and cards to the playoff games Friday night and those who helped clean up following lunch. Final and complete results of the marathon: Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Trego ...... 48,260 Mr. and 1rs. Jay Durfce .... 48,030 Dr. ,and Mrs. R. I. Port ........ 46,990 Mr. and Mrs. Scotty Glad- Stone .................................. 43,980 Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Duffee _42,810 Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Roberts 41,560 Mr. and Mrs. John Lindsey..40,940 Mr. and Mrs. John Binney _40,290 Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Cart ..40,130 Bernice Williams - Harriet Baldwin .............................. _40,060 Marion Thompson-Mamie McAnally ............................. 35,620 Mr. and Mrs. Everett Shipek 34,750 Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Loren- zen ...................................... 34,730 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sharp .... 34,670 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Shewey 33,980 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wagner_.22,890 Applicants for Counselor Position May Meet Board The Crook County High School board at its meeting in Moorcroft May 12 will meet with any appli- cants for a position as child guid- ance counselor in the county high schools. Scotty Gladstone, county attor- ney and Sundanee lawyer, who previously had recommended hir- ing of such a counselor, made the announcement that the board would meet with any applicants. The high school board, which has been studying the matter, has made no decision yet as to whether such a child guidance counselor will be hired." " Mimeograph hper at The Times Gathered in informal discuss. ion following the breakup of the Saturday night session are Park Service officials and members of the public who attended the meeting. From left to right, are: Willis ,Hughes, Vic French, AI Urness, Ted Rounds, Edwin Rounds, Ray- mond Gregg and John McLaugh- lin. --Tower (Continued from First Page) heavy concentration of people dur- ing the summer months. McIntyre said that if Congress gave its approval and if the land could be purchased, the camp- grounds would be moved to the river where there would be a )lentiful supply of water. i Part of the land, which the !Park Service proposes to add to the national monument, is on the Campstool ranch and would give the monument a river boundary. McIntyre stressed that an act of Congress would be necessary be- fore the land .could be purchased. And he said that if the land could- n't be purchased, the plan would have to be dropped. The addition, McIntyre said, would mean plenty of water for Devils Tower. He added that in a few years, the national monu- ment was going to need plenty of water. John McLaughlin, assistant reg- ional director from the Omaha of- fice of the Park Service, said the lands under discussion were ideal. But he, too, stressed that the ad- ditional land was only a proposal and that Congressional approval would have to be obtained before an attempt could be made to pur- chase the land. MeLaughlin also ironed out oth- er details concerning Devils Tow- er. He said no overnight cabins there were contemplated at pres- ent. He said that an amphitheater had been proposed for Devils Tower but that plans for that were still only in the proposal stage. Concerning money for the im- provements, McLaughlin said that the last appropriation started the new campground and that other 1955 funds would be available to start the other facilities. Other things in store for Devils Tower were revealed by Raymond Gregg, chief of interpretation for the Park Service's Omaha office. Expressing pleasant surprise at the large turnout for the meeting, Gregg said it was apparent that "tremendous momentum is under- way and that the anniversary pro- gram is well on its way." Pointing out the heavy increase in travel to Devils Tower, he said that the business of developing Devils Tower was a national thing and that the Park Service had the iob of telling people in the na- tion about Devils Tower. Gregg said that a Park Service historian would be at Devils Tow- er later to help McIntyre develop a history of the national monu- ment. In addition, be said a nat- uralist would be at Devils Tower this year and he said the Park Service hoped to have conducted tours around Devils Tower led by the Park Service naturalist. Gregg also mentioned the pro- posed amphitheater where pro- grams could be staged, improved signs and markers and the enlarge- ment of the staff at Devils Tower to .provide better service and long- er hours of operation. "The anniversary committee has mlde a *good start," Gregg said and he added that the Park Set- vice would give all possible assist- ance to the June 5 benefit pro- gram. The Omaha official said the Park Service director was interest- ed in the anniversary program and wanted everyone to help put over the program. He said the Wash- ington office was presently work- ing to land stories of the Antiqui- ties Act in national magazines during 1956. Other developments were re- ported by Bernd at the meeting. Commemorative Stamps To Be Issued The biggest development, Bernd said, was the approval granted to the issuing of two commemorative stamps in 1956. He said the Antiquities Act stamp would be issued in June, 1956 and the Devils Tower stamp in September, 1956. Devils Tower was the first monument to be es- tablished under the Antiquities Act. Bernd also covered the Devils Tower benefit program which will be combined with the Old Settlers Picnic at Devils Tower June 5. He said a one dollar contribution would be asked at the gate for the program but that a contribution was not necessary to see the pro-i gram. I Also covered by Bernd were: I 1. The printing of 50,000 envel- ope stuffers on Devils Tower. 2. A Devils Tower dispaly which will be shown at three travel shows to 1,000,000 people. 3. The Wyoming Federation of Women's Clubs convention which features a Devils Tower theme this year. 4. The disclosure that Devils Tower would be on the cover of the 1956 state highway map. Also heard during the meeting were Charles Smithson of. the Thos. D. Murphy Co. of Red Oak, Ia. and John Lindsey, publisher of The Sundance Times. Smithson discusesd and showed two proposed calendars featuring a'large color photograph of Devils Tower. The calendars are printed in home and business sizes. Smithson said the calendars were nQt exclusive but would be offer- ed to those who wanted to buy them. Lindsey discussed envelopes which will be printed entirely across the front with a cut of Dev- ils Tower. The illustration was drawn by Sidney Harvey. The en- velopes will be printed in two sizes and will be used as regular business envelopes by those who wish to buy them. The joint meeting was held at the Episcopal parish hall with members of the Episcopal Women's Guild serving the dinner. Lettermen's Club Dance Set for Saturday Night The fourth annual high school Lettermen's Club dance will be held. Saturday at the American Legion hall. The public has been inviil to attend the dance. Funds fm the dance will be used to purchase lettermen's jack- ets next year. --Benefit (Continued from First Page) Tower will be under the direction of Bernd and will feature talent from various Black Hills cities. Bernd said that Gov. Milward Simp- son had been invited to attend the program. Storm said the officers and directors of the Northern Black Hills Pioneer Association had de- cided to cancel the picnic this year in order that the benefit program could be held. However, Storm said he hoped that everyone who formerly at- tended the Old Settlers Picnic would attend the joint picnic and benefit program. As outlined by Bernd, the pro- gram will include band numbers by the Belle Fourche Cowboy band and the Gillette high school band. Featured on the program will be Alice Hand playing the Hammond organ in a 30-minute request pro- gram. Bernd said requests for that part of the program should be sent to the anniversary committee in Sundance. Assisting Miss Hand will be Tiny Burgess, xylophone soloist. The Newcastle Play Makers from Station KASL in Newcastle will also appear on the program plus other talent from Spearfish, Lead and Sundance. Bernd said a contribution of one dollar per person would be asked at the gate to provide operating funds for 1956 anniversary pro- gram. THE SUNDANCE TIMES Sundance, Wyo. April 21, --Weather (Continued from First ing the April total to 1.26 Average for April is 1.80 According to Blakeman's ords, 99.1 inches of snow Sundance from October until ril. March recorded the snowfall - 19.1 inches but 18 es of snow fell during the week in April. The snow fall by months as ported in inches shows: 14.5; November - 10.5; 9; January- 13.5; February" March - 19.1, and April - 18. Mrs. A. B. Durfee home Friday after week visiting Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg and family of Belle T BELLE FOURCHE, SO. D ' LAST TIME TODAY, APB Evening Shows 7:15, ! --Red Cross (Continued from First Page) Color b lile - $34.51; Sundance - $335.94; Selected Shorts Oshoto - $1.00; Moorcroft - $188.05, and Hulett - $100.75. Mrs. George, as chairman for the county, expressed her thanks Friday and Saturday, April for the assistance people had giv- Evening Shows 7:00, en to the fund drive. Saturday Matinee 2:00 Double Fetaure Progral Onion Skin at The Times. COMMERCIAL THEATER Sundance - 8:00 p.m. Friday-Saturday April 22-23 "THE STRANGER WORE A GUN" Starring Randolph Scott Claire Trevor in technicolor "He made a deal with death with both eyes open and both guns cocked." Sunday-Monday April 24-25 "GONE WITH THE WIND" Starring Clark Gable, Olivia De Havillan(t Leslie Howard Vivian Leigh In Technicolor "The picture acclaimed as the greatest of them all." TIME 7:00 O'CLOCK Sunday, Monday, April Continuous Shows SundaY 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 .A Monday Evening 7:00, 9 :av Paramount News and Shorts Tuesday, Wednesday an@ April 26, 27, 28 Evening Shows 7:00, Weds.-Thurs. April 27-28 "TARZAN ESCAPES" Starring Johnny Weissmuller Maureen O'Sullivan ORIGINAL TARZAN HIT : County Fairl Informal Talks End Meeting Board Plans 1955 work The Crook County Fair Board, meeting April 16 in Sundance, said it would accept contributions to be used to purchase materials to re- pair the fair buildings in Sundance. Other organizations in the coun- ty have appointed representatives to a fair building repair committee which will outline ways to raise money to repair the buildings. During the session, the board also worked on the 1955 budget. However, Willet Keyser said the budget had not yet been completed. The 1955 county fair also came in for discussion during last week's meeting. Scotty Gladstone and Harold Bernd, appearing for the Sundance American Legion and VFW posts, discussed entertain- ment plans for the fair. Keyser said it appeared that a carnival would be obtained for the fair. A county talent show will also round out the program. Vocational agriculture teachers p from the county's three high schools also attended the session and submitted their proposed bud- get for FFA premiums at the fair. --Bridge (Continued from First Page) However, the Tregos were near- ly nipped at the wire when Mr. and Mrs. Jay Durfee posted a re- sounding 6280 score, the highest of the tournament, to take second place money of $12 and fall only 235 points short of sneaking off with first place honors. In third position were Ports who won the $8 third prize. Rounding out the top ten were Gladstones, A. B. Durfees, Robertses, Lindseys, Binneys, Carrs and the team of Harriet Baldwin and Bernice Will- iams. FoIlowing completion of the tournament, it was revealed that 13 couples had already signed to enter next year's marathon. Other couples interested in joining may sign up by calling either Bernice William or Charlotte Lindsey. The PTA also expressed its thanks to persons who brought tables and cards to the playoff games Friday night and those who helped clean up following lunch. Final and complete results of the marathon: Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Trego ...... 48,260 Mr. and 1rs. Jay Durfce .... 48,030 Dr. ,and Mrs. R. I. Port ........ 46,990 Mr. and Mrs. Scotty Glad- Stone .................................. 43,980 Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Duffee _42,810 Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Roberts 41,560 Mr. and Mrs. John Lindsey..40,940 Mr. and Mrs. John Binney _40,290 Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Cart ..40,130 Bernice Williams - Harriet Baldwin .............................. _40,060 Marion Thompson-Mamie McAnally ............................. 35,620 Mr. and Mrs. Everett Shipek 34,750 Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Loren- zen ...................................... 34,730 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sharp .... 34,670 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Shewey 33,980 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wagner_.22,890 Applicants for Counselor Position May Meet Board The Crook County High School board at its meeting in Moorcroft May 12 will meet with any appli- cants for a position as child guid- ance counselor in the county high schools. Scotty Gladstone, county attor- ney and Sundanee lawyer, who previously had recommended hir- ing of such a counselor, made the announcement that the board would meet with any applicants. The high school board, which has been studying the matter, has made no decision yet as to whether such a child guidance counselor will be hired." " Mimeograph hper at The Times Gathered in informal discuss. ion following the breakup of the Saturday night session are Park Service officials and members of the public who attended the meeting. From left to right, are: Willis ,Hughes, Vic French, AI Urness, Ted Rounds, Edwin Rounds, Ray- mond Gregg and John McLaugh- lin. --Tower (Continued from First Page) heavy concentration of people dur- ing the summer months. McIntyre said that if Congress gave its approval and if the land could be purchased, the camp- grounds would be moved to the river where there would be a )lentiful supply of water. i Part of the land, which the !Park Service proposes to add to the national monument, is on the Campstool ranch and would give the monument a river boundary. McIntyre stressed that an act of Congress would be necessary be- fore the land .could be purchased. And he said that if the land could- n't be purchased, the plan would have to be dropped. The addition, McIntyre said, would mean plenty of water for Devils Tower. He added that in a few years, the national monu- ment was going to need plenty of water. John McLaughlin, assistant reg- ional director from the Omaha of- fice of the Park Service, said the lands under discussion were ideal. But he, too, stressed that the ad- ditional land was only a proposal and that Congressional approval would have to be obtained before an attempt could be made to pur- chase the land. MeLaughlin also ironed out oth- er details concerning Devils Tow- er. He said no overnight cabins there were contemplated at pres- ent. He said that an amphitheater had been proposed for Devils Tower but that plans for that were still only in the proposal stage. Concerning money for the im- provements, McLaughlin said that the last appropriation started the new campground and that other 1955 funds would be available to start the other facilities. Other things in store for Devils Tower were revealed by Raymond Gregg, chief of interpretation for the Park Service's Omaha office. Expressing pleasant surprise at the large turnout for the meeting, Gregg said it was apparent that "tremendous momentum is under- way and that the anniversary pro- gram is well on its way." Pointing out the heavy increase in travel to Devils Tower, he said that the business of developing Devils Tower was a national thing and that the Park Service had the iob of telling people in the na- tion about Devils Tower. Gregg said that a Park Service historian would be at Devils Tow- er later to help McIntyre develop a history of the national monu- ment. In addition, be said a nat- uralist would be at Devils Tower this year and he said the Park Service hoped to have conducted tours around Devils Tower led by the Park Service naturalist. Gregg also mentioned the pro- posed amphitheater where pro- grams could be staged, improved signs and markers and the enlarge- ment of the staff at Devils Tower to .provide better service and long- er hours of operation. "The anniversary committee has mlde a *good start," Gregg said and he added that the Park Set- vice would give all possible assist- ance to the June 5 benefit pro- gram. The Omaha official said the Park Service director was interest- ed in the anniversary program and wanted everyone to help put over the program. He said the Wash- ington office was presently work- ing to land stories of the Antiqui- ties Act in national magazines during 1956. Other developments were re- ported by Bernd at the meeting. Commemorative Stamps To Be Issued The biggest development, Bernd said, was the approval granted to the issuing of two commemorative stamps in 1956. He said the Antiquities Act stamp would be issued in June, 1956 and the Devils Tower stamp in September, 1956. Devils Tower was the first monument to be es- tablished under the Antiquities Act. Bernd also covered the Devils Tower benefit program which will be combined with the Old Settlers Picnic at Devils Tower June 5. He said a one dollar contribution would be asked at the gate for the program but that a contribution was not necessary to see the pro-i gram. I Also covered by Bernd were: I 1. The printing of 50,000 envel- ope stuffers on Devils Tower. 2. A Devils Tower dispaly which will be shown at three travel shows to 1,000,000 people. 3. The Wyoming Federation of Women's Clubs convention which features a Devils Tower theme this year. 4. The disclosure that Devils Tower would be on the cover of the 1956 state highway map. Also heard during the meeting were Charles Smithson of. the Thos. D. Murphy Co. of Red Oak, Ia. and John Lindsey, publisher of The Sundance Times. Smithson discusesd and showed two proposed calendars featuring a'large color photograph of Devils Tower. The calendars are printed in home and business sizes. Smithson said the calendars were nQt exclusive but would be offer- ed to those who wanted to buy them. Lindsey discussed envelopes which will be printed entirely across the front with a cut of Dev- ils Tower. The illustration was drawn by Sidney Harvey. The en- velopes will be printed in two sizes and will be used as regular business envelopes by those who wish to buy them. The joint meeting was held at the Episcopal parish hall with members of the Episcopal Women's Guild serving the dinner. Lettermen's Club Dance Set for Saturday Night The fourth annual high school Lettermen's Club dance will be held. Saturday at the American Legion hall. The public has been inviil to attend the dance. Funds fm the dance will be used to purchase lettermen's jack- ets next year. --Benefit (Continued from First Page) Tower will be under the direction of Bernd and will feature talent from various Black Hills cities. Bernd said that Gov. Milward Simp- son had been invited to attend the program. Storm said the officers and directors of the Northern Black Hills Pioneer Association had de- cided to cancel the picnic this year in order that the benefit program could be held. However, Storm said he hoped that everyone who formerly at- tended the Old Settlers Picnic would attend the joint picnic and benefit program. As outlined by Bernd, the pro- gram will include band numbers by the Belle Fourche Cowboy band and the Gillette high school band. Featured on the program will be Alice Hand playing the Hammond organ in a 30-minute request pro- gram. Bernd said requests for that part of the program should be sent to the anniversary committee in Sundance. Assisting Miss Hand will be Tiny Burgess, xylophone soloist. The Newcastle Play Makers from Station KASL in Newcastle will also appear on the program plus other talent from Spearfish, Lead and Sundance. Bernd said a contribution of one dollar per person would be asked at the gate to provide operating funds for 1956 anniversary pro- gram. THE SUNDANCE TIMES Sundance, Wyo. April 21, --Weather (Continued from First ing the April total to 1.26 Average for April is 1.80 According to Blakeman's ords, 99.1 inches of snow Sundance from October until ril. March recorded the snowfall - 19.1 inches but 18 es of snow fell during the week in April. The snow fall by months as ported in inches shows: 14.5; November - 10.5; 9; January- 13.5; February" March - 19.1, and April - 18. Mrs. A. B. Durfee home Friday after week visiting Mr. and Mrs. Kellogg and family of Belle T BELLE FOURCHE, SO. D ' LAST TIME TODAY, APB Evening Shows 7:15, ! --Red Cross (Continued from First Page) Color b lile - $34.51; Sundance - $335.94; Selected Shorts Oshoto - $1.00; Moorcroft - $188.05, and Hulett - $100.75. Mrs. George, as chairman for the county, expressed her thanks Friday and Saturday, April for the assistance people had giv- Evening Shows 7:00, en to the fund drive. Saturday Matinee 2:00 Double Fetaure Progral Onion Skin at The Times. COMMERCIAL THEATER Sundance - 8:00 p.m. Friday-Saturday April 22-23 "THE STRANGER WORE A GUN" Starring Randolph Scott Claire Trevor in technicolor "He made a deal with death with both eyes open and both guns cocked." Sunday-Monday April 24-25 "GONE WITH THE WIND" Starring Clark Gable, Olivia De Havillan(t Leslie Howard Vivian Leigh In Technicolor "The picture acclaimed as the greatest of them all." TIME 7:00 O'CLOCK Sunday, Monday, April Continuous Shows SundaY 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 .A Monday Evening 7:00, 9 :av Paramount News and Shorts Tuesday, Wednesday an@ April 26, 27, 28 Evening Shows 7:00, Weds.-Thurs. April 27-28 "TARZAN ESCAPES" Starring Johnny Weissmuller Maureen O'Sullivan ORIGINAL TARZAN HIT :