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Newspaper Archive of
The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
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July 11, 1946     The Sundance Times
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July 11, 1946
 

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In the Black Hills of Wyoming The Snndanee Times, Sundaaee, Wyoming [[ ii I i li i I ' I Babson sStatement, BABSON DISCUSSES [even as high as twenty thotlsand INVENTIONS AND [feet to withi-n one hundred feet UNEMPLOYMENT [of the true distance. Hence, in Ba,bson Park, Mass., July 5. i peacetime, radar will be installed As we look back over the con-| in ships and planes to enableI turies we find that almost every_ I navigatiu, in fog bound waters thing we enjoy today stems from [ and to make possible 'all weather' the contributions of*religion an~l [ flying. This will increase em- or science. Our standard of liv- ployment i'll many ways. lng, moreover, should refute the age_old argument that new in- ventions Increase unemployment. Each invention may 'at first cause an interruption in employment. Yet, eventually it becomes nec- essary to hire more workers to take care of the Increased busi- ness which the new ,machine ere_ ates, otherwise we would now be living in caves. Just a few illustrations: The development of new and improved machines for digging, grading, loading ,and trucking has made many projects possible which otherwise would never have been attempted. The open ~it mines are on such project. Some of these are about three miles wide and close to half a mile deep. Bulldozers and power shovels are continually gouging deeper into the earth and loading the ore in- to huge trucks. All such pits would have been impossible be_ fore modern excavators had been invented, even though these great excavators appear to throw many men out of work. NEW USES FOR RADAR AND AIRPLANES Radar continues to supply em- ployment for thousands even the ~tt was supposed to be only for war use. It is now ,being used for ocean travel i~ pitch ~blackness in only sketchily charted waters. It gives our ships the ability to without even coming within vis- ual distance. It gives eyes to mariners so that they .can pierce, camouflage or accurately locate other ships or obstacles. It judges the altitude of a plane flying ~w&d e~ ud Narble Works 4. L 0~.~ ~ n~nweon, a a The Jairplane in World War II wos indispensable. The design, manufacture and continuous op- eration of airplanes call for large scale employment in an industry which only a few years ago was non-existent. Already the helicopter is recognized as a revolutionary addition to the plane industry. The post office department plans to use heli- copters to transport mail 'be_ tween suburban areas and large city airports so as to guarantee twelve hour service between ,any two cities in the country. MANY NEW USES I~OR PLASTICS The plastic industry is one of the newer chemical inventions. Although it may usurp some busi- ness from other industry, through :a better or less expensive product, there are many altogether new uses for 'plastics which do not eliminate any former products. Hence, the plastics i~dustries will continue to expand and use in- creased man power. There is little danger of the wane of the plastics industry due to depletion of raw materials. Each day some new source, such as soy ,beans, corn husks, coal ,air and water, oil and milk, is discovered. Some of the plastics newer uses are piped lighti'ng, window- panes which filter out harmful rays of the sun, and nearly per- fect artificial eyes which actually fit the eye socket. Great possi,bil- ities await plastics in the refrig- eration field where materials must withstand extreme changes of moisture and temperature. Light-weight and non_magnetic qualities make plastics especially adaptable for aircraft instruments. pulp-preform molding is being used for radio cabinets, auto trailers, boat hulls, furniture and low cost housing. CONCLUSION Thus, from the new inventions spring new industries which continue to increase employment. They bring to each of us a better REPORT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER DISTRICT NO. 13 FUNDS RECEIVED AND DISBURSED DURING YEAR CASH RECEIVEIN-- Balance on hand beginning of fiscal year (school year closes on third Saturday in June) ............................................................ $ 28.99 Received from Government Oil Royalty Fund .................................... 409.36 Received from State School Land Income Fund ................................. 277.58 Received from Equalization Fund .................................................................. 1,093.17 Received from Aid to Public .Schools Contingent .............................. 559.87 @~Received from Poll Tax .......................................................................................... 26.00 Received from Special District Tax ............................................................... 747.00 Received from Sale of School Buildings and Sites .......... : ................ 3.00 TOTAL ............................ i ...................................................................................................... $3,144.97 CASH EXPENDED--- I---ADMINISTRATION I-A School Board expense ............................................................................. $ 30.00 I-B-4 Teacher retirement fund ............................................................ 44.90 II~INSTRUCTION II'-A-4 Rural teachers ................................................................................... 2,235.45 II-B BOOKS II-B-1 Text ........................................................................................................... 79.47 II-C Teaching supplies ............................................................................ m. ........ 20.67 III--OPERATION OF PLANT IIi-A-2 Federal withholding tax ......................................................... 32.60 III-B Fuel, water, light, power . ................................................................. 84.50 III-C Janitors' supplies ....................................................................................... 5.64 II[-D Other expenses of operation ............................................................ 11.00 V~AUXILIARY SERVICES V-D Tuition .................................................................................................................. 180.00 V-E Care of isolated children ..................................................................... 90.00 VI~MXED CHARGES VI-G Refund of :Land Income .................................................................... 40~45 VII---CAPITAL OUTLAY VII-B Purchase of new equipment ......................................................... 161.75 VIII~DEBT SERVICE VIII-A Interest on warrants ........................................................................29.38 Balance on hand at close of fiscal year ................................................ 99.16 TOTALS ................................................................................................................................. $3,144.97 Total amount of all warrants outstanding and not paid for lack of fullds ................................................................................................... 415.45 TIlE STATE OF WYOMING, ) ) ss. COUNTY OF CROOK ) I, H. N. KOKESH, Treasurer of District No. 13. Crook County, State of W'yomiug, do hereby certify the within report and foregoing to be correct. H. N, K,OKESH, Treasurer of District Da~e: June 17, 1946. i and cheaper product which is more pleasing to the eye and eases our daily tasks. These new industries employ hundreds of thousands of workers and are indirectly responsible for the em- ployment of further thousands. Does *it now appear ,as if new i.n- ventions ,are injurYous to lncreas.. ed employment? Rather, it strikes me they are an asset. X OBITUARY OF MATILDA SOPHIA SPANGLER Matilda Sophia Spangler passed away June 27th at the Sister's hospital in Hot Springs, S. D. after an illness of ten days at the age of 23, having been ~bor'n December 11, 1922 at Dade City, Fla. She grew to young woman- hood there and was a graduate of the Dude City high school. She was married to Wm. Spangler of Hulett, Wyo. January 27, 1946 at Dade City, Fla. On April 5th they came to Wyoming making their home at the Spasgler ranch near Hulett. The 'body was returned to Dade City for burial in the family lot, and was accompanied by" her widower and his sister, Mrs. W. S. Cozart of Aberdeen, S. D. She leaves to mourn her pass- ing her husband Wm. Spangler, her mother, Mrs. H. C. Shoard and three 'brothers and one sis- ter, Austin, Archer and David, all of bade City and Mrs. Mary Anderson of Miami, Fla. Her father passed away in July, 1945. x. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Cunning- h~m and Mr. and Mrs. Bert Eft- err, and little grandaughter of Torringt(m spent the Fourth of July with Mr. and Mrs. H. E. i Duvall at the Duvall residence in Router canyon. Thursday, July 11, 194d =' mi Rod Weeders and Summer Fallow Tool (7 Available) ROD RUNS UNDERGROUND Brings Clods from bottom UP Tears Weeds Out by Roots. Styled, geared instead of chained). We Now Have A Stock of Binding Twine (New Stock Tanks -- -- 2-Bottom Plows 1 Letz Feed Grinder With No. 222 blower Hart Scour Kleeners for No. 12 A Combine ~r C. D. Roberts Sundance ii~ i~!/!:!i!~iiI Those you can get with an OIL'PLATED engine CONOC0 m MOTOR 01L OIL-PLATES YOUR ENGINE IIII II II I Sutton's Garage Hulett Breathes there an American who isn't checking on cars ? Chief question is, "What's different for '457" An OIL*PLATF, D engine brings you this sweU difference: it will escape lots of carbon and sludge by escaping lots of wear. That special type of wear-defense--internal OIL-PI~TING--will likewise favor your oil and gasoline mileage. You can have an OIL-PLATRD engine in any car--in the newest or oldest--just simply by making sure to use ConOCo Nth motor oii; that's all, The difference in Conoco Neh oil--patented--is its added ingredient that OIL-PLAWES. Thiai8 done in a manner--by making metals attract and hold lubricant. And that's what puts inner engine surfaces under cover of OIL- Pr~Tm(3. It stands in wear's way; acts to prolong that heY/ car feeling .... And it will act to prolon~ any older ~ use/ulness. So if that's your particular problem, change nov7 to Conoco Nth oil--at Your Mileage Merchant's ConOCO station. Continental Oil Company II Carlile ServiCecarllle StatinI Goff's Service WondervleW Harvey's Service Sta.I Sundanee Grenier's Service Devils Tower Sundance Sundanee