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y, August 10, 2000 Opinions To voice a concern... board members of the Crook County Natural Resource and .two local ranchers attended a meeting between Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Association of Conservation Districts (WACD) on to voice concerns with new directions being taken by Protection Agency (EPA), the federal water agency. to ensure that our local constituents are repre- When the state agency makes decisions that may af- ability to address resource concerns locally. Those at- Were Ted Moline, Bud Streeter, Veronica Canfield, Dan and Odgen Driskill. County NRD with the support and direction of a advisory committee, after applying for the funds last was asked to create what the EPA terms a "Water- estoration Action Strategy" (WRAS). The District refused, the concerns that it is an action from the Clean Water Action Plan and because the contends EPA does not have the authority to condition Upon completion of a WRAS. The District prevailed June they received a letter indicating that they would the funds even though they refused to complete a se Crook County NRD, along with the local advisory up and resisted what we consider arbitrary and requirements being implemented by the EPA, we water quality funds without complying. We be- local people should continue to be allowed to deter- own destiny in the future. We went to Cheyenne to rtlr message to DEQ that we want them to advocate for people in the state of Wyoming, here in Crook County funds will be utilized to address the fecal coliform on two segments of the Belle Fourche River. The Chose to consult landowners and move forward with a watershed effort to restore water quality rather the state or federal agencies to determine the steps. Sincerely, Veronica Canfield Local Supervisor, CCNRD, and Vice-President of WACD Kudos to Tim when I traveled through your nice town I had the of meeting Officer Tim Hardin. I'm not sure I have correct. I do remember his first name, Tim. extremely friendly and kind. I was going over the on the east edge of town. He gave me a warning, the nicest officer I ever had stop me. Thank you, Shirley Leat Rapid City, SD k Newcomers to this county, we desperately need your help t, dry, and windy weather throughout the western has produced the unfavorable conditions to have active fire season, in all probability it will last first good snowstorm. As of the first of August, wild Several western states had burned over a million acres lands and trees in addition to many homes and other In Crook County, volunteer fire and ambulance responded to 86 calls from July 1 through August of these calls were fires, 98% of which were lightning. It has been several years since the last Season so we thought it would be helpful, especially to that have moved into the area more recently, to SOme information concerning our county fire suppres- response is the best hope to contain a wildfire. Rural by calling their neighbors for help, and all available responding with some type of field sprayer or shovels, Very effective in containing a blaze. It is very essential Our fires as small as possible, as one large fire requir- drops could deplete our entire fire budget. Neighbors one another in wildfire suppression have been the model .over the years for fire fighting. for the Crook county and city fire departments The men and women who serve in this way their time to assist in fire fighting in the field and ,.ss hours in other ways in training and main- "WHERE THE KID HIS NAME" raining equipment back at the station. There are no paid fire fighters in the county. Volunteer firefighters are dispatched through the emergency 911 system as they leave their hobs for hours and sometimes days to assist with fire suppression efforts. Therefore these volunteers are losing their income and their employers are also losing the income that is gener- ated from these employees. Traditionally, individuals in the community will provide secondary support to the volunteers in the form of hand labor, food and drinks during the fire. After the fire has been suppressed, it is the landowners responsibil- ity to keep an eye on the area to watch and mop up the hot spots; thereby releasing our fire department personnel and equipment to prepare for the next fire call. We need to continue to support the efforts of our volunteer fire departments in our communities in any way that we are able, especially if you are willing and able to join as a volun- teer firefighter. These individuals must be 18 years of age or older. The necessary training can be furnished free'of charge and with minimal time spent. This training is provided for the firefighters to protect their lives, and yours. Individuals under the age of 18 can fight fires with permis- sion and direct supervision of their parents or legal guardian. The Crook County board of commissioners had budgeted $52,000 this year to the fire control department. If it were not for the volunteers who donate their time, the county fire bud- get could easily be ten times this amount, especially during a busy fire season. The money would have to come from other departments within the county government or by raising your taxes. If you have any questions or need to find out what zone you live in, please contact County Fire Warden Elvin Rush, City Fire Chiefs or the local Zone Fire Wardens. Emergency Man- agement Coordinator Veronica Canfield is willing to coordi- nate workshops for training of new volunteers. Please call 283- 2390 or 283-1441 if you are interested or have comments Thank you, Elvin Rush, County Fire Warden Veronica Canfield, EM Coordinator IHOO& WyCAS results The district's 84 4th-grade students remained above average in all three areas. (The following are two-year averages with D indicating district average and S indi- cating state average). Reading: D (239)/S (235) Writing: D (237)/S (234) Math: D (231)/S (229) Nationally compared, local 4th graders fell into the 69 percentile with 50 percent being the national norm. Crook County's 102 8th grade results showed a slight decline, which Gates said is consistent with a statewide decline  this age group. Reading: V (234)/S (234) Writin D (242)/S (239) Math: D(231)/S (239) Compared nationally, dis- trict 8th graders fell into the 61 percentile. And the county's 120 1 l- grade students remained at the state average. Reading: D (237)/S (237) Writing: D (240)/S (241) Math: D (234)/S (233) The TerraNova national comparison shows county I l- graders in the 57 percentile. "Our goal, of course, is to be consistently above the state average," Gates said, "and we expect to always be above average nationally." Several external and inter- nat factors will cause a fluc- tuation in results from year to year, including the inter- ests and strengths of the stu- dents being tested. Gates noted that most of the district's teachers are atten- ding summer classes and workshops to enhance their teaching skills. Christian Women brunch to be held August 16 Crook County Christian Women's club will be holding a "Country Fair Special" brunch on Wednesday, Au- gust 16 at 10:00 a.m. at the Moorcroft Christian School. Those attending are asked to bring a craft item, baked goods or other treasure to be auctioned off by Charlee Mills-Kuhbacker of Oahoto. Josie Pearson of Aladdin will entertain with "Blue Ribbon Tunes." Karen Tosterud from Vermil- lion, SD will provide a pro- gram on "How to be a grand prize winner when dealing with life's changes." Reservations can be made by calling 283-2406, 467- 5740 or 756-3800. A free nursery is available. Bring a sack lunch for each child. LoCal " Scholarships * Jordan Franzen, Hulett, Dr. Dean Norum Memorial Scholarship at Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND. GET THING8 MOOOVING! The iumtIll The Sundance Times Everett E. Burgeson Investment Representative F_00iwardJones 120 W. Hudson P.O. Box 158 Speal;fish, SD 57783-1058 Bus 605-642-5778 Fax 605-642-5779 Hm 605-642-7875 800-233-4745 Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 i Sp " "l00ng Ink By Ehzabeth Canfield Old-time gardeners tell us that when we plant perennials, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep--and then by the third year they really come into their own. I'm beginning to believe the same is true of some government regulations. OSHA is a good example. Of course, we all wanted safety regulations for our workers. We didn't realize what over- zealous enforcers would interpret this to mean--until the program was well underway and had crippled or bankrupt many small businesses. It took many years to make this a viable and reason- able government agency. I think if we don't watch carefully, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working through its Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP), is going to be the cause of much undue hardship for Westerners. We all want a clean environment, clean unpolluted water in our streams, right? Are we going to be happy here in the West when the powers that be equate pollution from harmful chemicals and disease-laden water of many Eastern waterways with the contami- nation Wyoming streams carry from the deer and geese that live on or near our creeks? EPA and some radical environmental groups are pushing ranchers to move corrals away from these waterways, and insist that greater care must be given to septic systems. We are becoming a more populated state, with all the problems that humans seem to bring whenever they gather together. With the present trend toward small acreages where people build homes, keep a few horses or other animals, the problem will compound. There are presently funds available to assist with moving long- established corrals away from streams and waterways; this money will not be available down the road, from the reports I've read. Some of these measures are coming; we can't stop them all. My quarrel is with EPA's determination to use what many pro- fessional water quality people believe is incomplete and inconsis- tent data to enforce their regulations. The government's own Gen- eral Accounting Office issued a report saying present data is not consistent, complete or reliable. A US Geological Survey in 1993 indicated thai the present National Water Quality Inventory was ,so,severely flawed and scientifically invalid that it could not b used to smmnarlze water quality conditions and trends," :OSNA in . tirst radical years put many small foundries and manufacturers out of business; prices on machinery, vehicles and parts jumped tremendously, affecting us all. EPA, if it is not restrained will affect our lives, whether we are rural or urban Wyomingites, if it is allowed to pursue its present course. The cost will be prohibitive. The Crook County Natural Resource District, is part of an effort to modify EPA's denands, to bring common sense back to the table as we all search for ways to protect our environment. I don't know how many times I've heard here in Wyoming: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." True, of course. But how about a little preventive care--mend it before it breaks? It's far less costly, and saves a lot of wear and tear. The local district could use your help in the coming primary elec- tions, where it is asking for a one-half mill levy. For a ranch valued at $250,000, the tax would be about $11.86 per year; for a $65,000 home in one of our towns, it would amount to approximately $3.08, as estimated by the county assessor's of- rice. Back in earlier days, we supported our conservation district with a Harvest Festival, where we trekked to town with jars of jelly, hay, geese--even defiant little "Banty" hens and a few pigs ready for market. Townspeople sometimes went overboard, bid- ding far over market price for our offerings... Times have changed; Leonard McCullough is no longer with us to do the auctioneering. But in my heart, I feel the local district is a very worthwhile tool to help us keep up with the issues that are perhaps even more im- portant today, issues that, in the long run, are going to affect us all--in our way of life as well as in our pocketbooks. e thunder" r'olls...it's rally time asain Schelling t the end of the sidewalk watching a steady stream rumble past his family home in Moor- he honks and waves from leathered cyclists but notice the little boy sitting on his minia- that Papa and Granny gave him on his fourth April. The little boy is my grandnephew, Taylor. is Saturday afternoon rides on his grandpa's and, unlike those nonplussed by the influx of motorbikes, Taylor likes it. one feels about the rally, it's here again and big- ever in its 62nd year. (Sixtieth, actually, given the it clidn go for two years during the height of World gasoline was scarce and men were sent to war.) place the 2000 attendance near the half-million cry from the 200 Jackpine Gypsy men, women, who attended that first "Gypsy Camp" in the of J.C. qappy' and Pearl Hoel's Sturgis home on Avenue back in 1938. visited with 94-year old Pearl Hoel after last year's Predicted the event will only "get bigger, and I don we're going to put it." I guess it will just keep into the surrounding areasincluding Crook it or not. maintain order in this relatively quiet comer of the Wyoming Highway Patrol commissioned 45 extra the area, the Crook County Sheriff's department the reserves, and local police a making the debate remains whether too much law enforce- at rally events. Who knows how much is too wants to find out how much is too little? Not me. even mind standing in line at the local restaurant or nay turn at the gas pump. It's nice to see area getting a financial boost. like Taylor, I kind of like looking at the Harleys in all colors, shapes, and sizes...just like their y, August 10, 2000 Opinions To voice a concern... board members of the Crook County Natural Resource and .two local ranchers attended a meeting between Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Association of Conservation Districts (WACD) on to voice concerns with new directions being taken by Protection Agency (EPA), the federal water agency. to ensure that our local constituents are repre- When the state agency makes decisions that may af- ability to address resource concerns locally. Those at- Were Ted Moline, Bud Streeter, Veronica Canfield, Dan and Odgen Driskill. County NRD with the support and direction of a advisory committee, after applying for the funds last was asked to create what the EPA terms a "Water- estoration Action Strategy" (WRAS). The District refused, the concerns that it is an action from the Clean Water Action Plan and because the contends EPA does not have the authority to condition Upon completion of a WRAS. The District prevailed June they received a letter indicating that they would the funds even though they refused to complete a se Crook County NRD, along with the local advisory up and resisted what we consider arbitrary and requirements being implemented by the EPA, we water quality funds without complying. We be- local people should continue to be allowed to deter- own destiny in the future. We went to Cheyenne to rtlr message to DEQ that we want them to advocate for people in the state of Wyoming, here in Crook County funds will be utilized to address the fecal coliform on two segments of the Belle Fourche River. The Chose to consult landowners and move forward with a watershed effort to restore water quality rather the state or federal agencies to determine the steps. Sincerely, Veronica Canfield Local Supervisor, CCNRD, and Vice-President of WACD Kudos to Tim when I traveled through your nice town I had the of meeting Officer Tim Hardin. I'm not sure I have correct. I do remember his first name, Tim. extremely friendly and kind. I was going over the on the east edge of town. He gave me a warning, the nicest officer I ever had stop me. Thank you, Shirley Leat Rapid City, SD k Newcomers to this county, we desperately need your help t, dry, and windy weather throughout the western has produced the unfavorable conditions to have active fire season, in all probability it will last first good snowstorm. As of the first of August, wild Several western states had burned over a million acres lands and trees in addition to many homes and other In Crook County, volunteer fire and ambulance responded to 86 calls from July 1 through August of these calls were fires, 98% of which were lightning. It has been several years since the last Season so we thought it would be helpful, especially to that have moved into the area more recently, to SOme information concerning our county fire suppres- response is the best hope to contain a wildfire. Rural by calling their neighbors for help, and all available responding with some type of field sprayer or shovels, Very effective in containing a blaze. It is very essential Our fires as small as possible, as one large fire requir- drops could deplete our entire fire budget. Neighbors one another in wildfire suppression have been the model .over the years for fire fighting. for the Crook county and city fire departments The men and women who serve in this way their time to assist in fire fighting in the field and ,.ss hours in other ways in training and main- "WHERE THE KID HIS NAME" raining equipment back at the station. There are no paid fire fighters in the county. Volunteer firefighters are dispatched through the emergency 911 system as they leave their hobs for hours and sometimes days to assist with fire suppression efforts. Therefore these volunteers are losing their income and their employers are also losing the income that is gener- ated from these employees. Traditionally, individuals in the community will provide secondary support to the volunteers in the form of hand labor, food and drinks during the fire. After the fire has been suppressed, it is the landowners responsibil- ity to keep an eye on the area to watch and mop up the hot spots; thereby releasing our fire department personnel and equipment to prepare for the next fire call. We need to continue to support the efforts of our volunteer fire departments in our communities in any way that we are able, especially if you are willing and able to join as a volun- teer firefighter. These individuals must be 18 years of age or older. The necessary training can be furnished free'of charge and with minimal time spent. This training is provided for the firefighters to protect their lives, and yours. Individuals under the age of 18 can fight fires with permis- sion and direct supervision of their parents or legal guardian. The Crook County board of commissioners had budgeted $52,000 this year to the fire control department. If it were not for the volunteers who donate their time, the county fire bud- get could easily be ten times this amount, especially during a busy fire season. The money would have to come from other departments within the county government or by raising your taxes. If you have any questions or need to find out what zone you live in, please contact County Fire Warden Elvin Rush, City Fire Chiefs or the local Zone Fire Wardens. Emergency Man- agement Coordinator Veronica Canfield is willing to coordi- nate workshops for training of new volunteers. Please call 283- 2390 or 283-1441 if you are interested or have comments Thank you, Elvin Rush, County Fire Warden Veronica Canfield, EM Coordinator IHOO& WyCAS results The district's 84 4th-grade students remained above average in all three areas. (The following are two-year averages with D indicating district average and S indi- cating state average). Reading: D (239)/S (235) Writing: D (237)/S (234) Math: D (231)/S (229) Nationally compared, local 4th graders fell into the 69 percentile with 50 percent being the national norm. Crook County's 102 8th grade results showed a slight decline, which Gates said is consistent with a statewide decline  this age group. Reading: V (234)/S (234) Writin D (242)/S (239) Math: D(231)/S (239) Compared nationally, dis- trict 8th graders fell into the 61 percentile. And the county's 120 1 l- grade students remained at the state average. Reading: D (237)/S (237) Writing: D (240)/S (241) Math: D (234)/S (233) The TerraNova national comparison shows county I l- graders in the 57 percentile. "Our goal, of course, is to be consistently above the state average," Gates said, "and we expect to always be above average nationally." Several external and inter- nat factors will cause a fluc- tuation in results from year to year, including the inter- ests and strengths of the stu- dents being tested. Gates noted that most of the district's teachers are atten- ding summer classes and workshops to enhance their teaching skills. Christian Women brunch to be held August 16 Crook County Christian Women's club will be holding a "Country Fair Special" brunch on Wednesday, Au- gust 16 at 10:00 a.m. at the Moorcroft Christian School. Those attending are asked to bring a craft item, baked goods or other treasure to be auctioned off by Charlee Mills-Kuhbacker of Oahoto. Josie Pearson of Aladdin will entertain with "Blue Ribbon Tunes." Karen Tosterud from Vermil- lion, SD will provide a pro- gram on "How to be a grand prize winner when dealing with life's changes." Reservations can be made by calling 283-2406, 467- 5740 or 756-3800. A free nursery is available. Bring a sack lunch for each child. LoCal " Scholarships * Jordan Franzen, Hulett, Dr. Dean Norum Memorial Scholarship at Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND. GET THING8 MOOOVING! The iumtIll The Sundance Times Everett E. Burgeson Investment Representative F_00iwardJones 120 W. Hudson P.O. Box 158 Speal;fish, SD 57783-1058 Bus 605-642-5778 Fax 605-642-5779 Hm 605-642-7875 800-233-4745 Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 i Sp " "l00ng Ink By Ehzabeth Canfield Old-time gardeners tell us that when we plant perennials, the first year they sleep, the second year they creep--and then by the third year they really come into their own. I'm beginning to believe the same is true of some government regulations. OSHA is a good example. Of course, we all wanted safety regulations for our workers. We didn't realize what over- zealous enforcers would interpret this to mean--until the program was well underway and had crippled or bankrupt many small businesses. It took many years to make this a viable and reason- able government agency. I think if we don't watch carefully, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working through its Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP), is going to be the cause of much undue hardship for Westerners. We all want a clean environment, clean unpolluted water in our streams, right? Are we going to be happy here in the West when the powers that be equate pollution from harmful chemicals and disease-laden water of many Eastern waterways with the contami- nation Wyoming streams carry from the deer and geese that live on or near our creeks? EPA and some radical environmental groups are pushing ranchers to move corrals away from these waterways, and insist that greater care must be given to septic systems. We are becoming a more populated state, with all the problems that humans seem to bring whenever they gather together. With the present trend toward small acreages where people build homes, keep a few horses or other animals, the problem will compound. There are presently funds available to assist with moving long- established corrals away from streams and waterways; this money will not be available down the road, from the reports I've read. Some of these measures are coming; we can't stop them all. My quarrel is with EPA's determination to use what many pro- fessional water quality people believe is incomplete and inconsis- tent data to enforce their regulations. The government's own Gen- eral Accounting Office issued a report saying present data is not consistent, complete or reliable. A US Geological Survey in 1993 indicated thai the present National Water Quality Inventory was ,so,severely flawed and scientifically invalid that it could not b used to smmnarlze water quality conditions and trends," :OSNA in . tirst radical years put many small foundries and manufacturers out of business; prices on machinery, vehicles and parts jumped tremendously, affecting us all. EPA, if it is not restrained will affect our lives, whether we are rural or urban Wyomingites, if it is allowed to pursue its present course. The cost will be prohibitive. The Crook County Natural Resource District, is part of an effort to modify EPA's denands, to bring common sense back to the table as we all search for ways to protect our environment. I don't know how many times I've heard here in Wyoming: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." True, of course. But how about a little preventive care--mend it before it breaks? It's far less costly, and saves a lot of wear and tear. The local district could use your help in the coming primary elec- tions, where it is asking for a one-half mill levy. For a ranch valued at $250,000, the tax would be about $11.86 per year; for a $65,000 home in one of our towns, it would amount to approximately $3.08, as estimated by the county assessor's of- rice. Back in earlier days, we supported our conservation district with a Harvest Festival, where we trekked to town with jars of jelly, hay, geese--even defiant little "Banty" hens and a few pigs ready for market. Townspeople sometimes went overboard, bid- ding far over market price for our offerings... Times have changed; Leonard McCullough is no longer with us to do the auctioneering. But in my heart, I feel the local district is a very worthwhile tool to help us keep up with the issues that are perhaps even more im- portant today, issues that, in the long run, are going to affect us all--in our way of life as well as in our pocketbooks. e thunder" r'olls...it's rally time asain Schelling t the end of the sidewalk watching a steady stream rumble past his family home in Moor- he honks and waves from leathered cyclists but notice the little boy sitting on his minia- that Papa and Granny gave him on his fourth April. The little boy is my grandnephew, Taylor. is Saturday afternoon rides on his grandpa's and, unlike those nonplussed by the influx of motorbikes, Taylor likes it. one feels about the rally, it's here again and big- ever in its 62nd year. (Sixtieth, actually, given the it clidn go for two years during the height of World gasoline was scarce and men were sent to war.) place the 2000 attendance near the half-million cry from the 200 Jackpine Gypsy men, women, who attended that first "Gypsy Camp" in the of J.C. qappy' and Pearl Hoel's Sturgis home on Avenue back in 1938. visited with 94-year old Pearl Hoel after last year's Predicted the event will only "get bigger, and I don we're going to put it." I guess it will just keep into the surrounding areasincluding Crook it or not. maintain order in this relatively quiet comer of the Wyoming Highway Patrol commissioned 45 extra the area, the Crook County Sheriff's department the reserves, and local police a making the debate remains whether too much law enforce- at rally events. Who knows how much is too wants to find out how much is too little? Not me. even mind standing in line at the local restaurant or nay turn at the gas pump. It's nice to see area getting a financial boost. like Taylor, I kind of like looking at the Harleys in all colors, shapes, and sizes...just like their