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Page 4 - Thursday, August 10, 2000 AGRICULTURE The Sundance Northeast Wyoming New hard white winter wheat for Wyoming climate Researchers develop "Nuplains" wheat adapted to Wyoming&apos;s climate and soil To help Wyoming producers capture a piece of the interna- tional market for hard white wheat, the University of Wyo- ming Torrington Research and Extension Center (UW TREC) is releasing a winter va- riety developed cooperatively by the USDA ARS and the Univer- sity of Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station. "Nuplains is being released due to its superior end-use quality and white grain color combined with good yield po- tential and adequate disease re- sistance under Wyoming produc - tion condi- tions," said Agro- nomy Pro- fessor Jim Krall, UW Depart- ment of Plant Sciences. Hard white winter wheat is well-suited to Wyoming's cli- mate and soils. This variety should be competitive and complementary with Wyoming varieties of hard red wheat. Because Nuplains is the first release in this market class in Wyoming, growers should seg- regate it from hard red wheat. Initially, hard white wheat should be produced under a contract or identity-preserved system to ensure purity of the white wheat grain and to avoid mixed grain discounts. Because demand for hard white wheat isAncreasing in world export markets, this new winter variety has promising market- i "Nuplains is being released due to its superior end-use quality and white grain color combined with good yield potential and adequate disease resistance under Wyoming production conditions," Agronomy Professor Jim Krall, UW Department of Plant Sciences. ing potential. Many balkers and consumers prefer white wheat, especially when making fiat breads, tortillas and noodles. Research has shown that white wheat does not have the bitter taste associated with red wheat. Krall is optimistic about the future of Nuplains, but he cau- tions Wyoming producers to be aware this new variety is sus- ceptible to preharvest sprout- ing. Rain, high humidity and low temperatures after ripening can cause white grain to sprout the spike. "I have heard that some pro- ducers around Albin, Wyoming, had a problem a few years ago with a hard white wheat variety," noted Krall. "Researchers have found that resistance to head sprout is not necessarily related to seed coat color as once believed. I am optimistic about Nuplains in this regard because in the lab it was rated in the middle of the pack for resistance to head sprout." Hard white winter wheat pro- duction practices (seeding date, seeding rate, fertilization and harvesting} are the same as those used for red winter wheat. The same equipment also is used for both crops. However, drills, harvesting equipment and storage facilities must be carefully cleaned to ensure the two wheat classes do not mix. For more information about Nuplains, call Krall at (307) 532-7194 or visit the Produc- ing Hard White Wheat Web site at http: [/ianrwww.unl.edu / ianr/phrec/hww.htm. Wyoming trial results are on theWeb at http:// www.uwyo.edu / plants / key.htm. Here's another attempt to insinuate that SUV buyers are a bunch of nut cases. Minivan buyers, on the other hand, are about the nicest people you would ever want to meet. A story by Keith Bradsher of the New York Times Service says automakers have learned these things from closely guarded psychological research. The story claims buyers of sports utility vehicles are "more restless, more sybaritic, less social people who have strong conscious and subconscious fears of crime." Minivan owners, on the other hand, are more self-confident and more "other oriented" -- more involved with family, friends, and communities. Folks like me, who own an SUV and an old pickup truck, should probably be fitted with a jacket that buttons up the- back. I feel sorry for people who own both a minivan and an SUV. They must be terribly confused. I don't know where the media is getting this stuff. Anyone who uses the word "sybaritic" scares the devil out of me, anyway. I can't speak for other SUV owners, but I need mine to pull my boat. Every time I see a guy pulling a boat with a minivan I think to myself, "That poor devil is so hen-pecked his wife won't even let him use the truck." Automakers think we have deeper psychological reasons for buying SUVs. The New York Times story quotes David P. Bostwick, DaimlerChrysler's director of market research as say- ing minivan buyers tend to be more comfortable than sport utility buyers with being married. "We have a basic resistance in our society to admitting we are parents, and no longer able to go out and find another mate," Bostwick says. "If you have a sport utility, you can have the smoked windows, put the children in the back and pretend you are still single." Are you kidding me? Pretend you are single with a back seat full of kids?! My kids are grown up, but I wouldn't mind having the smoked windows. They would hide the sheep if nothing else. Bostwick seems to have an obsession with this marriage thing. He says sport utility buyers are more commonly concerned about feeling sexy, and like the idea they could use their vehicles to start dating again. There's one good way to put the kibosh on that kind of thinking. My brother heard this on the Red Green show. Red always has a little segment where he talks to the "older fellas," as he calls them. "You know who you are," he says. "I know some of you fellas have a little squabble with the missus now and then," Red says. "Sometimes you might get to thinking a divorce would be a good idea. "Here's what you should do when that happens. Just go into the bathroom and take off all your clothes. "Then look in the mirror. Turn around. Take a good look," he continues. "Now, do you really think you're in dating shape? Maybe you'd better just get back in there and try to patch things up." Crook County Fair tractor pulling results cases of sulfate-in- Sisson, Kokesh, duced polio have been identi- / ,fied in Wyom& cattle herds and Moline place Results for the tractor pulling contest, sponsored by the Black Hills Tractor Pulling Association, held in Suridance, Wednesday, August 2, at the Crook County fairgrounds are as follows: Class 1 1  - Merle Sisson, John Deere M, 2930 lbs., 31'. 2 n' - Gordon Loader, Farmall M, 3830 lbs., 30.3' 3 r - Bryan Culver, Ford 8N, 2870 lbs., 27'. Class 2 1" - Jack Burkhart, Allis WD, 3440 lbs., 42.4'. Class 3 1"' - Jack Burkhart, Allis WD, 4000 lbs., 62.1'. 2 "d - Rod Addison, Farmall W- 4, 3830 lbs., 62'. 3 r' - Willie Huston, Farmall W- 4, 3740 lbs., 51'. Class 4 1 +' - Mel Peterson, John Deere B, 4500 lbs., 80.4'. 2 "a - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4430 lbs., 75.7'. 3 ,d - Wilie Huston, Farmall W- 4, 4330 lbs., 75.4'. 4 'h - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4440 lbs., 74.6'. Class 5 i  - Larry Moriarty, John Deere 50, 5360 Ibs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Bud Watsabaugh, Farmall M, 5500 Ibs., 124.7' - 47.2'. 3  - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 88, 5500 lbs., 124.7' - 45.4' 4 'h - Willie Wilbur, Oliver 77, 5500 lbs., 1233'. 5 m - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 5450 lbs., 119.4'. 6 'h - Mel Peterson, John Deere B, 5370 lbs., 115'. 7 th - Larry Addison, John Deere 50, 4760 lbs., 95.8' 8 h - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4850 lbs., 92.5'. Class 6 1 ' - Nathan Allart, Case D, 6270 lbs., 61.7'. 2 "d - Bud Watsabaugh, Farmall M, 5950 lbs., 59'. 3 d - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 77, 6500 lbs., 51.9'. 4 'h - Larry Moriarty, John Deere 50, 6120 lbs., 51.2'. 4 th - Lauri Tefertiller, Minne- apolis Moline U, 5950 lbs., 51.2'. 5 m - Mike Wilbur, Farmall 350, 6140 lbs., 51.1'. Class 7 1" - Larry Bronamen, Farmall 450, 7470 lbs., 101.9'. 2 -a - Merritt Ludens, Farmall W-9, 7490 lbs., 92.1'. 3 *a - Duston Kokesh, John Deere 70, 6930 lbs., 88.5'. 4 m - Don Wilbur, Cockshutt, 7420 lbs., 71.6'. 5 h - Tom Huston, Case 800, 7340 lbs., 64.6'. 6 th - Greg Tefertiller, John Deere 70, 7360 lbs., 61.7'. 7 'h - Willie Wilbur, Massey 55, 7230 lbs., 54.4'. Class 8 1 =- Larry Broneman, Interna- tional 650, 8500 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 "d - Bill Huston, John Deere 730, 8500 lbs., 104.8'. 3 *d - Tom Huston, Case 800, 7930 lbs., 90.1'. 4 'h - Don Kokesh, John Deere 70, 6930 lbs., 86.9'. 5 th - Mike Wilbur, Farmall 450, 7890 lbs., 86'. 6 'h - Merritt Ludens, Farmall W-9, 7980 lbs., 85.4'. Class 9 1"- Bill Huston, John Deere 730, 9260 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Curt Elson, Case 900, 9140 lbs., 121.7'. 3 * - John Moline, John Deere 9420 lbs., 120.6'. 4 'h - Robert Wilbur, Farmall 560, 9100 lbs., 116.8'. Class 10 l ' - Curt Elson, Case 800. 9690 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 "a - Robert Wilbur, Farmall 560, 9820 lbs., 106'. Class 11 1 ' - Josh Krambeck, John Deere 820, 12040 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Curt Elson, Case 800, 9690 lbs., 124.8'. Class 12 1 ' - Josh Krambeck, John Deere 820, 12040 lbs., 63.9'. Sulfate induced polio Sizzling identified by State vet lab Ranch Ro, The Crook County II II Bridge Club Guest players had winning scores when B & T Bridge Club met Wednesday evening, Aug. 2. Betty Jean Durfee had high score with Allan Edwards second and Jane Edwards, low. Mrs. Edwards was guest hostess. Betts Seeley will host the club on Aug. 16. this summer.-"Although there are many causes and types of polio, the most probable cause in this case is high sulfur in- take. Because Wyoming is experi- encing a drought and ponds are drying up, the water available to animals is more concen- trated and salty. Sulfate is part of the salt. "Two thousand five hundred parts per million sul- fate ion is the amount of sulfur in water that may cause this type of polio," said Merl Raisbeck, professor and toxi- cologist in the UW College of Agriculture Department of Vet- erinary Sciences. In many parts of the country, polio in cattle is caused by a thiamin deficiency and can be treated. Unfortunately in Wyo- ming, that's not usually the case. Although sulfate-induced polio is not infectious, 95 per- cent of the time it is a fatal poi- soning. "Many producers don't realize the hazard associated with high-sulfate water, and they assume the animals will just lose weight," Raisbeck said. "In reality, they're going to lose the entire animal." Signs of sulfate-induced po- lio are obvious. Initially, the animal will go off feed and be lethargic for a few hours or a day or so. Facial muscles and ears may twitch. Because polio affects the central nervous sys- tem, the animal will walk with a wobbling, staggering gait and may become blind. Due to the onset of blindness, the animal often attempts to walk through objects or stands in a corner and presses its head against the wall. During the last stages of the illness, the animal will be- gin convulsing. "Local veterinarians can con- firm polio," Raisbeck said. "But this year, those signs combined with brackish water lead to a pretty straightforward diagno- sis." . Concerned producers should test sulfur levels in their water supplies. Dipstick test kits are available through lab supply stores, or water samples can be sent to the Wyoming State Vet Lab in Laramie. "If your test results show high levels of sulfur, there are only three things you can do," Raisbeck explained. "You can move the cattle to an area with a cleaner water supply, truck water into the pasture to dilute the existing pond or accept the losses this year." For more information about sulfate-induced polio or water testing, contact Raisbeck by phone at (307J 742-6638 or by e-mail at raisbeck@uwyo.edu <mailto:raisbeck@uwyo.edu >. J Wimt to exlxe your opinion.?  u your letter k) e editor. ' All leer= m.=t  dot=l, r, kjr, ,i d4re. & teleptote ,urer. Association held Rodeo Friday evening, with six teams Moorcroft Bunch, Range Riders, J Bar Wishbone Fencing, and Turbiville & Co. The teams compete events: Wild Cow Branding, Team Race, and Trailer Final results were: bone Fencing (Rod Noyce, Larry Steele, Zach Steele, and Second-Moorc Williams, Charlie Chancey Williams, son, Dusty Thomas, Robinson}. (Terry Goodvin, Cleve Bowles, Lance Rogers, Goodvin, and Bo Roll]. Bar F Team (Steve Traylor, C.J. Hodson, Burch, Jake Fenner, Fitzgerald). (Dewey Turbiville, ville, Everett Kenny Fordyce, Clay and Cori Turbiville). Creek Range Riders ham, Scott Graham, Jennifer Gill, Vance Wendy Bossman). District One Is Priority One "We need fewer laws, less federal intervention, and more local control. These have been and will continue to be my goals in serving District One." Re-Elect MARLENE SIMONS To The WY House of Representatives For further information see Marlene's web page at: www.gillettenetwork.com/simons e-mail: msimons@house.wyoming.com .5 _, ...., When I haa heart problems, some folks told me to head to Mayo, Denver or Minneapolis. But I live here. Fortunately, told me about The Heart Doctors. Their highly-trained visits my town regularly, They diagnosed my problem, treated then put me on the road to recovery. And that's the only I wanted to travel. The Heart The Center of Cardiovascular 725 Meade St., Rapid City 1-800-HEART-22 Page 4 - Thursday, August 10, 2000 AGRICULTURE The Sundance Northeast Wyoming New hard white winter wheat for Wyoming climate Researchers develop "Nuplains" wheat adapted to Wyoming's climate and soil To help Wyoming producers capture a piece of the interna- tional market for hard white wheat, the University of Wyo- ming Torrington Research and Extension Center (UW TREC) is releasing a winter va- riety developed cooperatively by the USDA ARS and the Univer- sity of Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station. "Nuplains is being released due to its superior end-use quality and white grain color combined with good yield po- tential and adequate disease re- sistance under Wyoming produc - tion condi- tions," said Agro- nomy Pro- fessor Jim Krall, UW Depart- ment of Plant Sciences. Hard white winter wheat is well-suited to Wyoming's cli- mate and soils. This variety should be competitive and complementary with Wyoming varieties of hard red wheat. Because Nuplains is the first release in this market class in Wyoming, growers should seg- regate it from hard red wheat. Initially, hard white wheat should be produced under a contract or identity-preserved system to ensure purity of the white wheat grain and to avoid mixed grain discounts. Because demand for hard white wheat isAncreasing in world export markets, this new winter variety has promising market- i "Nuplains is being released due to its superior end-use quality and white grain color combined with good yield potential and adequate disease resistance under Wyoming production conditions," Agronomy Professor Jim Krall, UW Department of Plant Sciences. ing potential. Many balkers and consumers prefer white wheat, especially when making fiat breads, tortillas and noodles. Research has shown that white wheat does not have the bitter taste associated with red wheat. Krall is optimistic about the future of Nuplains, but he cau- tions Wyoming producers to be aware this new variety is sus- ceptible to preharvest sprout- ing. Rain, high humidity and low temperatures after ripening can cause white grain to sprout the spike. "I have heard that some pro- ducers around Albin, Wyoming, had a problem a few years ago with a hard white wheat variety," noted Krall. "Researchers have found that resistance to head sprout is not necessarily related to seed coat color as once believed. I am optimistic about Nuplains in this regard because in the lab it was rated in the middle of the pack for resistance to head sprout." Hard white winter wheat pro- duction practices (seeding date, seeding rate, fertilization and harvesting} are the same as those used for red winter wheat. The same equipment also is used for both crops. However, drills, harvesting equipment and storage facilities must be carefully cleaned to ensure the two wheat classes do not mix. For more information about Nuplains, call Krall at (307) 532-7194 or visit the Produc- ing Hard White Wheat Web site at http: [/ianrwww.unl.edu / ianr/phrec/hww.htm. Wyoming trial results are on theWeb at http:// www.uwyo.edu / plants / key.htm. Here's another attempt to insinuate that SUV buyers are a bunch of nut cases. Minivan buyers, on the other hand, are about the nicest people you would ever want to meet. A story by Keith Bradsher of the New York Times Service says automakers have learned these things from closely guarded psychological research. The story claims buyers of sports utility vehicles are "more restless, more sybaritic, less social people who have strong conscious and subconscious fears of crime." Minivan owners, on the other hand, are more self-confident and more "other oriented" -- more involved with family, friends, and communities. Folks like me, who own an SUV and an old pickup truck, should probably be fitted with a jacket that buttons up the- back. I feel sorry for people who own both a minivan and an SUV. They must be terribly confused. I don't know where the media is getting this stuff. Anyone who uses the word "sybaritic" scares the devil out of me, anyway. I can't speak for other SUV owners, but I need mine to pull my boat. Every time I see a guy pulling a boat with a minivan I think to myself, "That poor devil is so hen-pecked his wife won't even let him use the truck." Automakers think we have deeper psychological reasons for buying SUVs. The New York Times story quotes David P. Bostwick, DaimlerChrysler's director of market research as say- ing minivan buyers tend to be more comfortable than sport utility buyers with being married. "We have a basic resistance in our society to admitting we are parents, and no longer able to go out and find another mate," Bostwick says. "If you have a sport utility, you can have the smoked windows, put the children in the back and pretend you are still single." Are you kidding me? Pretend you are single with a back seat full of kids?! My kids are grown up, but I wouldn't mind having the smoked windows. They would hide the sheep if nothing else. Bostwick seems to have an obsession with this marriage thing. He says sport utility buyers are more commonly concerned about feeling sexy, and like the idea they could use their vehicles to start dating again. There's one good way to put the kibosh on that kind of thinking. My brother heard this on the Red Green show. Red always has a little segment where he talks to the "older fellas," as he calls them. "You know who you are," he says. "I know some of you fellas have a little squabble with the missus now and then," Red says. "Sometimes you might get to thinking a divorce would be a good idea. "Here's what you should do when that happens. Just go into the bathroom and take off all your clothes. "Then look in the mirror. Turn around. Take a good look," he continues. "Now, do you really think you're in dating shape? Maybe you'd better just get back in there and try to patch things up." Crook County Fair tractor pulling results cases of sulfate-in- Sisson, Kokesh, duced polio have been identi- / ,fied in Wyom& cattle herds and Moline place Results for the tractor pulling contest, sponsored by the Black Hills Tractor Pulling Association, held in Suridance, Wednesday, August 2, at the Crook County fairgrounds are as follows: Class 1 1  - Merle Sisson, John Deere M, 2930 lbs., 31'. 2 n' - Gordon Loader, Farmall M, 3830 lbs., 30.3' 3 r - Bryan Culver, Ford 8N, 2870 lbs., 27'. Class 2 1" - Jack Burkhart, Allis WD, 3440 lbs., 42.4'. Class 3 1"' - Jack Burkhart, Allis WD, 4000 lbs., 62.1'. 2 "d - Rod Addison, Farmall W- 4, 3830 lbs., 62'. 3 r' - Willie Huston, Farmall W- 4, 3740 lbs., 51'. Class 4 1 +' - Mel Peterson, John Deere B, 4500 lbs., 80.4'. 2 "a - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4430 lbs., 75.7'. 3 ,d - Wilie Huston, Farmall W- 4, 4330 lbs., 75.4'. 4 'h - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4440 lbs., 74.6'. Class 5 i  - Larry Moriarty, John Deere 50, 5360 Ibs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Bud Watsabaugh, Farmall M, 5500 Ibs., 124.7' - 47.2'. 3  - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 88, 5500 lbs., 124.7' - 45.4' 4 'h - Willie Wilbur, Oliver 77, 5500 lbs., 1233'. 5 m - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 5450 lbs., 119.4'. 6 'h - Mel Peterson, John Deere B, 5370 lbs., 115'. 7 th - Larry Addison, John Deere 50, 4760 lbs., 95.8' 8 h - Ed Tubbs, Oliver 77, 4850 lbs., 92.5'. Class 6 1 ' - Nathan Allart, Case D, 6270 lbs., 61.7'. 2 "d - Bud Watsabaugh, Farmall M, 5950 lbs., 59'. 3 d - Ben Tubbs, Oliver 77, 6500 lbs., 51.9'. 4 'h - Larry Moriarty, John Deere 50, 6120 lbs., 51.2'. 4 th - Lauri Tefertiller, Minne- apolis Moline U, 5950 lbs., 51.2'. 5 m - Mike Wilbur, Farmall 350, 6140 lbs., 51.1'. Class 7 1" - Larry Bronamen, Farmall 450, 7470 lbs., 101.9'. 2 -a - Merritt Ludens, Farmall W-9, 7490 lbs., 92.1'. 3 *a - Duston Kokesh, John Deere 70, 6930 lbs., 88.5'. 4 m - Don Wilbur, Cockshutt, 7420 lbs., 71.6'. 5 h - Tom Huston, Case 800, 7340 lbs., 64.6'. 6 th - Greg Tefertiller, John Deere 70, 7360 lbs., 61.7'. 7 'h - Willie Wilbur, Massey 55, 7230 lbs., 54.4'. Class 8 1 =- Larry Broneman, Interna- tional 650, 8500 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 "d - Bill Huston, John Deere 730, 8500 lbs., 104.8'. 3 *d - Tom Huston, Case 800, 7930 lbs., 90.1'. 4 'h - Don Kokesh, John Deere 70, 6930 lbs., 86.9'. 5 th - Mike Wilbur, Farmall 450, 7890 lbs., 86'. 6 'h - Merritt Ludens, Farmall W-9, 7980 lbs., 85.4'. Class 9 1"- Bill Huston, John Deere 730, 9260 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Curt Elson, Case 900, 9140 lbs., 121.7'. 3 * - John Moline, John Deere 9420 lbs., 120.6'. 4 'h - Robert Wilbur, Farmall 560, 9100 lbs., 116.8'. Class 10 l ' - Curt Elson, Case 800. 9690 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 "a - Robert Wilbur, Farmall 560, 9820 lbs., 106'. Class 11 1 ' - Josh Krambeck, John Deere 820, 12040 lbs., FULL PULL. 2 " - Curt Elson, Case 800, 9690 lbs., 124.8'. Class 12 1 ' - Josh Krambeck, John Deere 820, 12040 lbs., 63.9'. Sulfate induced polio Sizzling identified by State vet lab Ranch Ro, The Crook County II II Bridge Club Guest players had winning scores when B & T Bridge Club met Wednesday evening, Aug. 2. Betty Jean Durfee had high score with Allan Edwards second and Jane Edwards, low. Mrs. Edwards was guest hostess. Betts Seeley will host the club on Aug. 16. this summer.-"Although there are many causes and types of polio, the most probable cause in this case is high sulfur in- take. Because Wyoming is experi- encing a drought and ponds are drying up, the water available to animals is more concen- trated and salty. Sulfate is part of the salt. "Two thousand five hundred parts per million sul- fate ion is the amount of sulfur in water that may cause this type of polio," said Merl Raisbeck, professor and toxi- cologist in the UW College of Agriculture Department of Vet- erinary Sciences. In many parts of the country, polio in cattle is caused by a thiamin deficiency and can be treated. Unfortunately in Wyo- ming, that's not usually the case. Although sulfate-induced polio is not infectious, 95 per- cent of the time it is a fatal poi- soning. "Many producers don't realize the hazard associated with high-sulfate water, and they assume the animals will just lose weight," Raisbeck said. "In reality, they're going to lose the entire animal." Signs of sulfate-induced po- lio are obvious. Initially, the animal will go off feed and be lethargic for a few hours or a day or so. Facial muscles and ears may twitch. Because polio affects the central nervous sys- tem, the animal will walk with a wobbling, staggering gait and may become blind. Due to the onset of blindness, the animal often attempts to walk through objects or stands in a corner and presses its head against the wall. During the last stages of the illness, the animal will be- gin convulsing. "Local veterinarians can con- firm polio," Raisbeck said. "But this year, those signs combined with brackish water lead to a pretty straightforward diagno- sis." . Concerned producers should test sulfur levels in their water supplies. Dipstick test kits are available through lab supply stores, or water samples can be sent to the Wyoming State Vet Lab in Laramie. "If your test results show high levels of sulfur, there are only three things you can do," Raisbeck explained. "You can move the cattle to an area with a cleaner water supply, truck water into the pasture to dilute the existing pond or accept the losses this year." For more information about sulfate-induced polio or water testing, contact Raisbeck by phone at (307J 742-6638 or by e-mail at raisbeck@uwyo.edu <mailto:raisbeck@uwyo.edu >. J Wimt to exlxe your opinion.?  u your letter k) e editor. ' All leer= m.=t  dot=l, r, kjr, ,i d4re. & teleptote ,urer. Association held Rodeo Friday evening, with six teams Moorcroft Bunch, Range Riders, J Bar Wishbone Fencing, and Turbiville & Co. The teams compete events: Wild Cow Branding, Team Race, and Trailer Final results were: bone Fencing (Rod Noyce, Larry Steele, Zach Steele, and Second-Moorc Williams, Charlie Chancey Williams, son, Dusty Thomas, Robinson}. (Terry Goodvin, Cleve Bowles, Lance Rogers, Goodvin, and Bo Roll]. Bar F Team (Steve Traylor, C.J. Hodson, Burch, Jake Fenner, Fitzgerald). (Dewey Turbiville, ville, Everett Kenny Fordyce, Clay and Cori Turbiville). Creek Range Riders ham, Scott Graham, Jennifer Gill, Vance Wendy Bossman). District One Is Priority One "We need fewer laws, less federal intervention, and more local control. These have been and will continue to be my goals in serving District One." Re-Elect MARLENE SIMONS To The WY House of Representatives For further information see Marlene's web page at: www.gillettenetwork.com/simons e-mail: msimons@house.wyoming.com .5 _, ...., When I haa heart problems, some folks told me to head to Mayo, Denver or Minneapolis. But I live here. Fortunately, told me about The Heart Doctors. Their highly-trained visits my town regularly, They diagnosed my problem, treated then put me on the road to recovery. And that's the only I wanted to travel. The Heart The Center of Cardiovascular 725 Meade St., Rapid City 1-800-HEART-22