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The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
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August 10, 2000     The Sundance Times
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August 10, 2000
 

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2ooo "WHERE THE KID  The Sundance Times Rauth Rancher, Alva it is an excellent the western states been represented very Having someone here close to" the Will hopefully make Jackie Canfield Ranch wife, Sundance I actually don't know that much about him, and just be- cause he is from Wyoming doesn't mean he will repre- sent the ranchers, but it is a good start. Betty White Retired rancher, Sundance I think it is great; he will represent Wyoming the way it should be done. Carolyn Hook Ranch wife, Alva I liked everything he stood for when he was in Congress, being against total gun-con- trol and for agriculture. It's a great choice. pun hobby turns l into keepsake gifts f00,t peek at FIi woo. Schelling Having always had a fasci That quickly explains why nation for spinning, Diane fi- her collection is primarily of and her spinning come to you step into Di- home, tastefully with a fascinating of European spin- J her collec- t-four wheels--all of which were ac- Europe. Most, she nally found someone to teach her the "dying craft of spin- ning" while her family was living in Europe. Finding someone to learn the art from took Diane ten years; learning took one af- ternoon in 1991, and mas- tering the craft has taken several years. She says spin- ning helped "keep me sane" during seven years of mov- ' look ea$ierthan R really is. hag all over Europe while her husband Earl was on assign- ment with a special branch of the U.S. Army; it keeps her content now that he's a busy trooper with the Wyoming Highway Patrol. Living in Europe afforded Diane the opportunity to ac- cumulate her vast collection of spinning wheels. "I would get up early (3:00 or 4:00 o'clock) on Saturday mornings to beat the crowds to the flea market," which is where she found most of her wheels, ranging in cost be- tween $50-$75, she said. After Earl's retirement from a 22-year Army career, the Gills moved back to the Uni- ted States where Diane says a good spinning wheel might cost several hundred dollars. in working condi- are too old to try. French cherry fitted with a pew- for spinning linen, comer of the Gill's while a wheel in a Dutch e graces another. the hall in the din- sets a German th a finger-dipping Spinning flax, be- wheel and spin- A host more are among the antique pickers, and ue items of inter- the house. love old things," =Everything is so Row, but I like older European wheels, most of which she has figured out how to operate. "Once you know how to spin, it's not too hard to fig- ure out how each wheel works," she says in a quiet, unassuming manner. The wheel Diane actually uses for spinning is a mod- em treadle model which gets to whirring so steadily that it looks like spinning is quite easy to do. That's why I was so eager to try my hand at it when invited to do so. Wen...it isn't' that easy, Dian  just makes it look that wa i ....... A stickler for doing a task from "start to finish', Diane begins with bags of raw wool she buys from area ranch- ers. She washes and dries it, then combs, spins, and dyes the freshened wool be- fore using it in a knitting or crochet project. Two pounds of wool usually makes one adult-sized sweater, which Gill says she usually gives away as gifts. Gill modestly says her tal- ent is not unique. She re- cently hosted a "dyeing party" at which she and other local spinners--Judy Hart, Joyce Speidel, Becky Roll, and Cin- dy Corean---dyed wool with boiled sagebrush. Gill says Koolaid, walnut bark, golden- rod and most any colorful in- gredient can be used in the dyeing process. Her hands apparently never still, Gill counts tatting, knit- ting, crochet, and bobbin lace among her many other hob- bies. "I had already learned Russian bobbin lace and was learning Belgian when we left Europe," Diane said. She continues to learn on her own from a book. Weaving, she says, is next on her list of handcraft arts to learn. While some of us dread the onset of winter and the cold, falling snow,. Diane looks for- ward to a time when she can sit beside her pellet stove and lose herself in yet another handspun craft. 10 years ago: August 2, 1990 Beulah's 100th birthday cel- ebration has been planned for Sunday. A picnic starting at noon will be held at the Beulah Com- munity Building, formerly the old Beulah schoolhouse. Horseshoe pitching and vol- leyball games will be held and early day pictures of Beulah and pioneers will be on display. 20 years ago: August 7, 1980 The Dale Carnegie Moskee ranch was sold for $235,000 to a midwesterner who wishes to re- main anonymous at a Saturday auction. The auction drew a large crowd, but only a few were serious bidders. Within ten minutes of the auction, the bidding field was narrowed down. Only four bidders participated with the escalation of the price. Bidding started at $100,000. The Moskee area home was built in the late 1950s by Dor- othy Carnegie following Dale Carnegie's death. 30 years ago: August 13, 1970 Miss Rodeo Crook County, 18- year-old Kay Cox, Moorcroft, will reign over this year's Crook County Fair and Rodeo. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Cox, she was crowned queen in June at the Hulett rodeo. Kay will compete in the Miss Rodeo Wyoming competi- tion at the Wyoming State Fair later this month. 40 years ago: August 11, 1960 Rain, measuring 1.27 inches over the weekend, put anend to the plus-90 degree readings of August and at the same time drastically lowered the fire dan- ger throughout the area. It was the first heavy rain in some time in this area. The moisture resulted in low read- ings of 35 over the weekend and Maker! STEEL BUILDING SALE THIS LITTLE WAGON IS TRULY A FREEDOM WAGON! Freedom from financial worries! Freedom to work as you please! Freedom to go where you like! Sell popcorn, Bar-B-Q, candy, snow cones, hot dogs, whatever you wish. Cashwagons, Inc. P.O. Box 199 Sidney, NE 69162 1-800-543-1732 Ask for Mrl Cash PREMIER STEEL 1-800-973-3366 www.premiersteel.org Dealerships Available! ltw you can tt0r tall courses. call: or ext. 1,5 is just a away complete a BUSINESS DEGREE Register todayl UNIVERSITY OF WVOMING eCollegf. The Outreach School Want to be a Candidate? Wyoming Libertarian Nominating Convention August 12, 2000, 10 a.m. Shilo Inn (I-25 & Curtis) Casper For more information: Dennis Brossman: 332-4574 James Blomquist: 856-7878 Or: selfgov2OOO@yahoo.com Paid for by the Wyoming Liberlanan Party Vicki White Numerator, Hulett Hopefully he has enough common sense and knowledge to represent us ranchers in the White House. It is impor- tant to have somebody with an understanding for wildlife, ranching and farming high up in the ranks. ..... - .... i ! L /ill !ii ! !  ! : i ! i ;  !i i i  i I Phil Nelman Sawmill owner, Hulett Actually I think he should run for President and Bush should be Vice-President. He has more leadership skills than anybody in politics these days. He will restore order and bring integrity back to the White House. put a definite tinge of autumn in the air. The fire index slumped off to moderate after reading high last week. 50 years ago: August 10, 1950 The annual cattle run is ex- pected to get underway the lat- ter part of this month, according to Charles Oudin, Crook County livestock inspector. Oudin made the statement in reporting the livestock shipments out of the county during the month of July. He termed the July shipment "light". He disclosed that 773 head of cattle and 139 horses had been shipped to open markets from the county during July. An addi- tional 62 head of cattle and 23 horses were sent out of 'the county to pastures and feedlots. 60 years ago: August 8. 1940 At a special meeting held Mon- day the county commissioners set the levy for the coming year at 5.287 mills for the general county levy. This levy is a reduction from that of last year, which was 6 1/2 mills. The amounts assessed for the various school districts will vary according to their needs. A large reserve on hand was the largest contributing factor in lowering the tax, Francis Hejde, county clerk said. 70 years ago: August 6, 1"930 Gillette and vicinity was greatly excited last week by, the alleged discovery of gold in the Pumpkin Butte country in southern Campbell county, but geologists dampened prospects of a gold rush there when they reporte d that there was little probability of finding ore in commercial quantities. 80 years ago: August I 1, 1920 Bert Waddell, and George Lytle, of Sundance who was formerly of The Sundance Times, have pur- chased the Moorcroft Democrat from Charles McKee, the former editor, and state that they in- tend to run an independent newspaper. Times Chumlfled Ads 8sve Time, Money, Effort See Tim Verhulst Commercial ' *Residential, ": Carpet & Ceramic* *Wood * Peirgo, ShawM00 car00ts Availcble iolusiVeI i Are you planning a move to Laramie? Would you like a great job that makes a difference in someone's life and is flexible with School schedules? Ark Regional Services may have a position for you. Jobs available that provide creative and challenging opportunities to assist adults with developmental disabilities in a residential setting with independence, individual achievement or inclusion. Be paid while you learn CPR, First Aid, MANDT, effective teaching and active listening iechniques. Competitive salary and paid vacation leave available. If interested, contact the Human Resources Department at Ark Regional Services, 1150 N. 3rd, Laramie, WY 82072, phone: (307) 742-6641, fax (307) 742- 9203 or on the web at www.arkregionalservices.com ul UV.MUS,C CAR SHOW BAR-B-QUE LARRY LEADERS MEMORIAL =RIDE FOR LIFE" BENEFIT POKER RUN I   ] SATURDAY, AUG. 26, 2000 All vehicles welcome- $10.00 per poker hand. Registration from 7:30- 11:00 a.n at Ted s Supper Club, J-at  nwy. 191 West of Rock Springs, WY 1 ,,,:,, ,a, cr, Last card drawn by 6 p.m. at Expedition Island in Green Rivei; WY . Tmino*o h, = = ,-,t, Cash prizes for the top three and low poker hands. , whotUmrha.,andcysticJsh=P'fibrosis.tten' tt Reporter needed at twice-weekly Cody (Wyo.) Enterprise. Newsroom, Quark, journalism experience nec- essary. Join the staff of one of Wyoming's best newspapers and enjoy life in the Yellowstone Park region. Health ins., 401(K), more. Apply to Bruce McC0rmack , (307) 587-2231. i i 2ooo "WHERE THE KID  The Sundance Times Rauth Rancher, Alva it is an excellent the western states been represented very Having someone here close to" the Will hopefully make Jackie Canfield Ranch wife, Sundance I actually don't know that much about him, and just be- cause he is from Wyoming doesn't mean he will repre- sent the ranchers, but it is a good start. Betty White Retired rancher, Sundance I think it is great; he will represent Wyoming the way it should be done. Carolyn Hook Ranch wife, Alva I liked everything he stood for when he was in Congress, being against total gun-con- trol and for agriculture. It's a great choice. pun hobby turns l into keepsake gifts f00,t peek at FIi woo. Schelling Having always had a fasci That quickly explains why nation for spinning, Diane fi- her collection is primarily of and her spinning come to you step into Di- home, tastefully with a fascinating of European spin- J her collec- t-four wheels--all of which were ac- Europe. Most, she nally found someone to teach her the "dying craft of spin- ning" while her family was living in Europe. Finding someone to learn the art from took Diane ten years; learning took one af- ternoon in 1991, and mas- tering the craft has taken several years. She says spin- ning helped "keep me sane" during seven years of mov- ' look ea$ierthan R really is. hag all over Europe while her husband Earl was on assign- ment with a special branch of the U.S. Army; it keeps her content now that he's a busy trooper with the Wyoming Highway Patrol. Living in Europe afforded Diane the opportunity to ac- cumulate her vast collection of spinning wheels. "I would get up early (3:00 or 4:00 o'clock) on Saturday mornings to beat the crowds to the flea market," which is where she found most of her wheels, ranging in cost be- tween $50-$75, she said. After Earl's retirement from a 22-year Army career, the Gills moved back to the Uni- ted States where Diane says a good spinning wheel might cost several hundred dollars. in working condi- are too old to try. French cherry fitted with a pew- for spinning linen, comer of the Gill's while a wheel in a Dutch e graces another. the hall in the din- sets a German th a finger-dipping Spinning flax, be- wheel and spin- A host more are among the antique pickers, and ue items of inter- the house. love old things," =Everything is so Row, but I like older European wheels, most of which she has figured out how to operate. "Once you know how to spin, it's not too hard to fig- ure out how each wheel works," she says in a quiet, unassuming manner. The wheel Diane actually uses for spinning is a mod- em treadle model which gets to whirring so steadily that it looks like spinning is quite easy to do. That's why I was so eager to try my hand at it when invited to do so. Wen...it isn't' that easy, Dian  just makes it look that wa i ....... A stickler for doing a task from "start to finish', Diane begins with bags of raw wool she buys from area ranch- ers. She washes and dries it, then combs, spins, and dyes the freshened wool be- fore using it in a knitting or crochet project. Two pounds of wool usually makes one adult-sized sweater, which Gill says she usually gives away as gifts. Gill modestly says her tal- ent is not unique. She re- cently hosted a "dyeing party" at which she and other local spinners--Judy Hart, Joyce Speidel, Becky Roll, and Cin- dy Corean---dyed wool with boiled sagebrush. Gill says Koolaid, walnut bark, golden- rod and most any colorful in- gredient can be used in the dyeing process. Her hands apparently never still, Gill counts tatting, knit- ting, crochet, and bobbin lace among her many other hob- bies. "I had already learned Russian bobbin lace and was learning Belgian when we left Europe," Diane said. She continues to learn on her own from a book. Weaving, she says, is next on her list of handcraft arts to learn. While some of us dread the onset of winter and the cold, falling snow,. Diane looks for- ward to a time when she can sit beside her pellet stove and lose herself in yet another handspun craft. 10 years ago: August 2, 1990 Beulah's 100th birthday cel- ebration has been planned for Sunday. A picnic starting at noon will be held at the Beulah Com- munity Building, formerly the old Beulah schoolhouse. Horseshoe pitching and vol- leyball games will be held and early day pictures of Beulah and pioneers will be on display. 20 years ago: August 7, 1980 The Dale Carnegie Moskee ranch was sold for $235,000 to a midwesterner who wishes to re- main anonymous at a Saturday auction. The auction drew a large crowd, but only a few were serious bidders. Within ten minutes of the auction, the bidding field was narrowed down. Only four bidders participated with the escalation of the price. Bidding started at $100,000. The Moskee area home was built in the late 1950s by Dor- othy Carnegie following Dale Carnegie's death. 30 years ago: August 13, 1970 Miss Rodeo Crook County, 18- year-old Kay Cox, Moorcroft, will reign over this year's Crook County Fair and Rodeo. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Cox, she was crowned queen in June at the Hulett rodeo. Kay will compete in the Miss Rodeo Wyoming competi- tion at the Wyoming State Fair later this month. 40 years ago: August 11, 1960 Rain, measuring 1.27 inches over the weekend, put anend to the plus-90 degree readings of August and at the same time drastically lowered the fire dan- ger throughout the area. It was the first heavy rain in some time in this area. The moisture resulted in low read- ings of 35 over the weekend and Maker! STEEL BUILDING SALE THIS LITTLE WAGON IS TRULY A FREEDOM WAGON! Freedom from financial worries! Freedom to work as you please! Freedom to go where you like! Sell popcorn, Bar-B-Q, candy, snow cones, hot dogs, whatever you wish. Cashwagons, Inc. P.O. Box 199 Sidney, NE 69162 1-800-543-1732 Ask for Mrl Cash PREMIER STEEL 1-800-973-3366 www.premiersteel.org Dealerships Available! ltw you can tt0r tall courses. call: or ext. 1,5 is just a away complete a BUSINESS DEGREE Register todayl UNIVERSITY OF WVOMING eCollegf. The Outreach School Want to be a Candidate? Wyoming Libertarian Nominating Convention August 12, 2000, 10 a.m. Shilo Inn (I-25 & Curtis) Casper For more information: Dennis Brossman: 332-4574 James Blomquist: 856-7878 Or: selfgov2OOO@yahoo.com Paid for by the Wyoming Liberlanan Party Vicki White Numerator, Hulett Hopefully he has enough common sense and knowledge to represent us ranchers in the White House. It is impor- tant to have somebody with an understanding for wildlife, ranching and farming high up in the ranks. ..... - .... i ! L /ill !ii ! !  ! : i ! i ;  !i i i  i I Phil Nelman Sawmill owner, Hulett Actually I think he should run for President and Bush should be Vice-President. He has more leadership skills than anybody in politics these days. He will restore order and bring integrity back to the White House. put a definite tinge of autumn in the air. The fire index slumped off to moderate after reading high last week. 50 years ago: August 10, 1950 The annual cattle run is ex- pected to get underway the lat- ter part of this month, according to Charles Oudin, Crook County livestock inspector. Oudin made the statement in reporting the livestock shipments out of the county during the month of July. He termed the July shipment "light". He disclosed that 773 head of cattle and 139 horses had been shipped to open markets from the county during July. An addi- tional 62 head of cattle and 23 horses were sent out of 'the county to pastures and feedlots. 60 years ago: August 8. 1940 At a special meeting held Mon- day the county commissioners set the levy for the coming year at 5.287 mills for the general county levy. This levy is a reduction from that of last year, which was 6 1/2 mills. The amounts assessed for the various school districts will vary according to their needs. A large reserve on hand was the largest contributing factor in lowering the tax, Francis Hejde, county clerk said. 70 years ago: August 6, 1"930 Gillette and vicinity was greatly excited last week by, the alleged discovery of gold in the Pumpkin Butte country in southern Campbell county, but geologists dampened prospects of a gold rush there when they reporte d that there was little probability of finding ore in commercial quantities. 80 years ago: August I 1, 1920 Bert Waddell, and George Lytle, of Sundance who was formerly of The Sundance Times, have pur- chased the Moorcroft Democrat from Charles McKee, the former editor, and state that they in- tend to run an independent newspaper. Times Chumlfled Ads 8sve Time, Money, Effort See Tim Verhulst Commercial ' *Residential, ": Carpet & Ceramic* *Wood * Peirgo, ShawM00 car00ts Availcble iolusiVeI i Are you planning a move to Laramie? Would you like a great job that makes a difference in someone's life and is flexible with School schedules? Ark Regional Services may have a position for you. Jobs available that provide creative and challenging opportunities to assist adults with developmental disabilities in a residential setting with independence, individual achievement or inclusion. Be paid while you learn CPR, First Aid, MANDT, effective teaching and active listening iechniques. Competitive salary and paid vacation leave available. If interested, contact the Human Resources Department at Ark Regional Services, 1150 N. 3rd, Laramie, WY 82072, phone: (307) 742-6641, fax (307) 742- 9203 or on the web at www.arkregionalservices.com ul UV.MUS,C CAR SHOW BAR-B-QUE LARRY LEADERS MEMORIAL =RIDE FOR LIFE" BENEFIT POKER RUN I   ] SATURDAY, AUG. 26, 2000 All vehicles welcome- $10.00 per poker hand. Registration from 7:30- 11:00 a.n at Ted s Supper Club, J-at  nwy. 191 West of Rock Springs, WY 1 ,,,:,, ,a, cr, Last card drawn by 6 p.m. at Expedition Island in Green Rivei; WY . Tmino*o h, = = ,-,t, Cash prizes for the top three and low poker hands. , whotUmrha.,andcysticJsh=P'fibrosis.tten' tt Reporter needed at twice-weekly Cody (Wyo.) Enterprise. Newsroom, Quark, journalism experience nec- essary. Join the staff of one of Wyoming's best newspapers and enjoy life in the Yellowstone Park region. Health ins., 401(K), more. Apply to Bruce McC0rmack , (307) 587-2231. i i