"
Newspaper Archive of
The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
Lyft
October 17, 2002     The Sundance Times
PAGE 1     (1 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 17, 2002
 

Newspaper Archive of The Sundance Times produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2021. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




undallce agws zxLg llC 65 BOX 201 ' 72B52-9501 "Where the Kid got his name" The County Newspaper of Larry and Nancy Cassidy Continuing the Crook Coun O, news since 1884 of state urges Sundance yearbook staffers: Best in State! ance voters to polls admendments B, C and D Oazy WiUimms Wyoming Secretary of State Joe Meyer was in Sundance last promoting voter education on the four proposed consti- amendments to the Wyoming Constitution which will ap- pear on next month's ballot. The proposed amendments A, B, C and D, if passed by the voters, would change the Wyoming con- stitution to allow the following changes: Amendment A: Would allow a majority of the elected members of each house to convene a spe- cial legislative session; the governor's power to call a special session of the legislature would not be affected. Amendment B: This amend- ment seeks to allow the Wyoming legislature, not the courts, to de- termine Presidential election con- tests in the same manner it de- termines legislative contests. The amendment was designed to pre- vent situations similar to that occurred in Florida during the last presidential election. Ati: Would limit the governor's partial veto authority item veto authority} to apply only to general appropriations bills. AallM: Would provide that amendments to the Wyoming proposed by the Wyoming Legislature will be submitted the electors of the state without prior presentment to the Gover- for his approval or disapproval. his personal stance on the amendment proposals, Meye r that he favors Amendments B, C and D, and would consider neither opposed to nor in favor of Amendment A. He stressed o A is a significant change if it is sanctioned by the and urged that voters carefully consider the pros and cons of proposal before voting. As he stated, "No vote at all is the same a 'no' vote for each amendment proposal," so it is important for to be sure they vote according to their views. forunl for Hulett the candidates Oct. 27 Oar F WilIJmms T. ere will be a Candidates' Forum on Sunday, October 27, 2002, at Hulett Civic Center. Hosted by BearLodge Multiple Use Associa- (BLMUA), the forum will start at 6:00 p.m., include refreshments break, and conclude around 9:00 p.m. All candidates for state county offices have been invited to participate. It will be an ex- opportunity to meet the candidates and hear firsthand their on the issues. The BLMUA is a grass-roots, non-profit organization concerned with continued multiple use of public lands. The mission of the BLMUA to educate and inform its members and the public on current is- which affect them. information on the Candidates' Forum, please contact Linda 467- 5219 or Tonya Tysver at 467-5244. Sundance High School yearbook members returned from the Wyo- While attending the Press Association convention, two yearbook ming High School Press Association meeting in Casper on October 7 staffers, Mati Kahler and Nicole Sharp, presented their own session with the top award for All-State yearbook in the 2A division, on Caption Writing to fellow students and yearbook advisors. The Bulldog staff and their advisor, Kathy Eddy, not only won top Asked the secret to their success, Nicole Sharp pointed out that honors all-around for their yearbook; they were also singled out for much of the yearbook's popularity was probably due to a more per- special recognition with additional 1st place awards in Layout Design sonal approach in writing it. "We wanted a more behind-the-scenes and in Theme Development. Their outstanding writing and design were two special areas of praise mentioned as factors in awarding them top honors. This is the third year in a row that Sundance has captured top honors in the state. The Bulldog has twice been selected as a national marketing sample by the yearbook publishing company, Walsworth Publishing of Mis- souri. look at our school." It is an approach that is clearly working for the Bulldog staff. Yearbook advisor, Kathy Eddy, cited a number of students who made excellent contributions, including last year's seniors: Megan Waller, Amanda Lambert, Megan Schnorenberg, Caitlin Gade and Nicole Nolan. Some of the returning staffers include: Mati Kahler, Nicole Sh, Clint Sell, Josh Croell, Jacob Cornelia and Whitney Inz. -- helps Sundance elementary Stampede develop writing skills ,., at Ox Yoke Ranch 14 calves lost, 3 vehicles totaled By: Gary Williams Friday night was a wild one at the Reinecke's Ox Yoke Ranch when 142 Black Angus calves broke out of their weaning pen and stampeded onto In- terstate 90, causing at least three vehicles to be totaled after smashing into the calves. Fourteen of the calves were either killed outright by the ve- hicles or were injured so badly they had to be de- stroyed. According to Kathy Clarkson from the Ox Yoke Ranch, the calves had just been weaned from their mothers that week. As she pointed out, weaning is always an ordeal in the best of circumstances, and this particular group of calves was younger than the normal age of weaned calves because the Reineckes had to leave their Forest Service allot- ment four weeks early this year. As a result, the calves were edgy and anxious. Clarkson related that in Gene Reinecke's opinion, something, possibly a dog, spooked them, causing them to break through a six-foot high heavy duty wire fence with large cable reinforced by ten-inch planks. Besides breaking these formidable barriers, the calves managed to also break through the Interstate fencing before running onto the highway. Because all the calves were black and the stampede happened at around 10:15 p.m. on a very dark night, it was inevitable that vehicles driving on the highway would fail to see the calves in time to avoid accidents. Crook County Sheriff Steve Stahla was one of a number of law enforcement personnel from Wyo- ming and South Dakota who were called to the scene. According to him, the scene was one of mass at Sundance Elementary School have been benefitting from a unique writing program called {Writers In Electronic Residence}. The WEIR program is part of the Wyoming Arts Council and is to encourage creative writing at the elementary level through online interaction and discussion of students' writing. Students are assigned writing projects by their classroom teachers. Each student is allowed to sub- mit up to 750 words to the online program where it is read and feedback is offered by professional writ- ers in residence, Page Lambert and Robert Priest. Students are encouraged to engage in a discussion based on the responses they receive from the au- thors and other participants. Each participating stu- dent is required to be active in the discussion pro- cesa and to revise original writing. The three signifi- cant elements of the program are discussion, revi- sion and response, whether the response is writer- to-student, student-to-student, or student-to-writer. The program encourages students to develop and write their own views when responding to an item or when pursuing a particular thought or question. Once exploration of a particular work reaches a natural conclusion, each student must post a concluding note to the discussion that has evolved in response to his or her work. According to sixth-grade teacher, Jan Truchot, the WEIR program is a big success. Truchot is enthusi- "astic about the progress the program has generated among her students. "Over the course of the last two years, we have had about eight kids' materials published on the WEIR web site. WEIR has turned some kids on to writing, and gotten them to do revi- sions like nothing else Ie ever seen in 26 years in the classroomff Robort Pflest Page Lambert The program is popular with the students, too. Truchot relates a story about two boys sitting at ad- jacent computers, no teacher nearby. They are talk- ! to each other and, as Truchot tells it, "I head over thinking they are probably off task, but before I on them, I listen. They are discussing which of two verbs is more powerful to use in one boy's sentencer That's WEIRff confusion and disarray. Calves were scattered from the Ox Yoke Ranch, over the Interstate highway and throughout gulches surrounding the highway. To further complicate matters, by all accounts it was very, very dark--a factor contributing to the dif- ficulty of spotting and then catching stampeding black calves, some headed east, others west. The sheriff chuckled, "It was a dandy. I sure could've used a horse about then." Clarkson summarized the situation best when she said, "The babies were trying to get back to their mommies.  Once the calves were reunited with their mothers the situation quieted down. It then be- came a matter of treating minor lacerations, cuts and bruises, filing accident reports and clearing the highway for normal traffic once again. There was plenty of damage, including the total loss of three vehicles, a badly damaged semi truck and fourteen fatalities among the calves, a loss x)f approximately $7,000 in livestock to Reinecke. Thcirb was a loss of sleep, as well, for a large number ranchers, law enforcement personnel, EMT and, of course, young calves. Clarkson said that the calves: were re-weaned on Saturday and that things h quieted down, although she and Reinecke were sll z picking up one young fugitive calf that had ma-- aged to make its way as far as downtown Beulah  Sunday. .-. By Monday morning a weary, but relieved Clarka was able to report that all livestock was account e for and that the foremost thought being Bhared b , everyone was a heartfelt gratitude that there hd i been no serious injuries resulting from the melej undallce agws zxLg llC 65 BOX 201 ' 72B52-9501 "Where the Kid got his name" The County Newspaper of Larry and Nancy Cassidy Continuing the Crook Coun O, news since 1884 of state urges Sundance yearbook staffers: Best in State! ance voters to polls admendments B, C and D Oazy WiUimms Wyoming Secretary of State Joe Meyer was in Sundance last promoting voter education on the four proposed consti- amendments to the Wyoming Constitution which will ap- pear on next month's ballot. The proposed amendments A, B, C and D, if passed by the voters, would change the Wyoming con- stitution to allow the following changes: Amendment A: Would allow a majority of the elected members of each house to convene a spe- cial legislative session; the governor's power to call a special session of the legislature would not be affected. Amendment B: This amend- ment seeks to allow the Wyoming legislature, not the courts, to de- termine Presidential election con- tests in the same manner it de- termines legislative contests. The amendment was designed to pre- vent situations similar to that occurred in Florida during the last presidential election. Ati: Would limit the governor's partial veto authority item veto authority} to apply only to general appropriations bills. AallM: Would provide that amendments to the Wyoming proposed by the Wyoming Legislature will be submitted the electors of the state without prior presentment to the Gover- for his approval or disapproval. his personal stance on the amendment proposals, Meye r that he favors Amendments B, C and D, and would consider neither opposed to nor in favor of Amendment A. He stressed o A is a significant change if it is sanctioned by the and urged that voters carefully consider the pros and cons of proposal before voting. As he stated, "No vote at all is the same a 'no' vote for each amendment proposal," so it is important for to be sure they vote according to their views. forunl for Hulett the candidates Oct. 27 Oar F WilIJmms T. ere will be a Candidates' Forum on Sunday, October 27, 2002, at Hulett Civic Center. Hosted by BearLodge Multiple Use Associa- (BLMUA), the forum will start at 6:00 p.m., include refreshments break, and conclude around 9:00 p.m. All candidates for state county offices have been invited to participate. It will be an ex- opportunity to meet the candidates and hear firsthand their on the issues. The BLMUA is a grass-roots, non-profit organization concerned with continued multiple use of public lands. The mission of the BLMUA to educate and inform its members and the public on current is- which affect them. information on the Candidates' Forum, please contact Linda 467- 5219 or Tonya Tysver at 467-5244. Sundance High School yearbook members returned from the Wyo- While attending the Press Association convention, two yearbook ming High School Press Association meeting in Casper on October 7 staffers, Mati Kahler and Nicole Sharp, presented their own session with the top award for All-State yearbook in the 2A division, on Caption Writing to fellow students and yearbook advisors. The Bulldog staff and their advisor, Kathy Eddy, not only won top Asked the secret to their success, Nicole Sharp pointed out that honors all-around for their yearbook; they were also singled out for much of the yearbook's popularity was probably due to a more per- special recognition with additional 1st place awards in Layout Design sonal approach in writing it. "We wanted a more behind-the-scenes and in Theme Development. Their outstanding writing and design were two special areas of praise mentioned as factors in awarding them top honors. This is the third year in a row that Sundance has captured top honors in the state. The Bulldog has twice been selected as a national marketing sample by the yearbook publishing company, Walsworth Publishing of Mis- souri. look at our school." It is an approach that is clearly working for the Bulldog staff. Yearbook advisor, Kathy Eddy, cited a number of students who made excellent contributions, including last year's seniors: Megan Waller, Amanda Lambert, Megan Schnorenberg, Caitlin Gade and Nicole Nolan. Some of the returning staffers include: Mati Kahler, Nicole Sh, Clint Sell, Josh Croell, Jacob Cornelia and Whitney Inz. -- helps Sundance elementary Stampede develop writing skills ,., at Ox Yoke Ranch 14 calves lost, 3 vehicles totaled By: Gary Williams Friday night was a wild one at the Reinecke's Ox Yoke Ranch when 142 Black Angus calves broke out of their weaning pen and stampeded onto In- terstate 90, causing at least three vehicles to be totaled after smashing into the calves. Fourteen of the calves were either killed outright by the ve- hicles or were injured so badly they had to be de- stroyed. According to Kathy Clarkson from the Ox Yoke Ranch, the calves had just been weaned from their mothers that week. As she pointed out, weaning is always an ordeal in the best of circumstances, and this particular group of calves was younger than the normal age of weaned calves because the Reineckes had to leave their Forest Service allot- ment four weeks early this year. As a result, the calves were edgy and anxious. Clarkson related that in Gene Reinecke's opinion, something, possibly a dog, spooked them, causing them to break through a six-foot high heavy duty wire fence with large cable reinforced by ten-inch planks. Besides breaking these formidable barriers, the calves managed to also break through the Interstate fencing before running onto the highway. Because all the calves were black and the stampede happened at around 10:15 p.m. on a very dark night, it was inevitable that vehicles driving on the highway would fail to see the calves in time to avoid accidents. Crook County Sheriff Steve Stahla was one of a number of law enforcement personnel from Wyo- ming and South Dakota who were called to the scene. According to him, the scene was one of mass at Sundance Elementary School have been benefitting from a unique writing program called {Writers In Electronic Residence}. The WEIR program is part of the Wyoming Arts Council and is to encourage creative writing at the elementary level through online interaction and discussion of students' writing. Students are assigned writing projects by their classroom teachers. Each student is allowed to sub- mit up to 750 words to the online program where it is read and feedback is offered by professional writ- ers in residence, Page Lambert and Robert Priest. Students are encouraged to engage in a discussion based on the responses they receive from the au- thors and other participants. Each participating stu- dent is required to be active in the discussion pro- cesa and to revise original writing. The three signifi- cant elements of the program are discussion, revi- sion and response, whether the response is writer- to-student, student-to-student, or student-to-writer. The program encourages students to develop and write their own views when responding to an item or when pursuing a particular thought or question. Once exploration of a particular work reaches a natural conclusion, each student must post a concluding note to the discussion that has evolved in response to his or her work. According to sixth-grade teacher, Jan Truchot, the WEIR program is a big success. Truchot is enthusi- "astic about the progress the program has generated among her students. "Over the course of the last two years, we have had about eight kids' materials published on the WEIR web site. WEIR has turned some kids on to writing, and gotten them to do revi- sions like nothing else Ie ever seen in 26 years in the classroomff Robort Pflest Page Lambert The program is popular with the students, too. Truchot relates a story about two boys sitting at ad- jacent computers, no teacher nearby. They are talk- ! to each other and, as Truchot tells it, "I head over thinking they are probably off task, but before I on them, I listen. They are discussing which of two verbs is more powerful to use in one boy's sentencer That's WEIRff confusion and disarray. Calves were scattered from the Ox Yoke Ranch, over the Interstate highway and throughout gulches surrounding the highway. To further complicate matters, by all accounts it was very, very dark--a factor contributing to the dif- ficulty of spotting and then catching stampeding black calves, some headed east, others west. The sheriff chuckled, "It was a dandy. I sure could've used a horse about then." Clarkson summarized the situation best when she said, "The babies were trying to get back to their mommies.  Once the calves were reunited with their mothers the situation quieted down. It then be- came a matter of treating minor lacerations, cuts and bruises, filing accident reports and clearing the highway for normal traffic once again. There was plenty of damage, including the total loss of three vehicles, a badly damaged semi truck and fourteen fatalities among the calves, a loss x)f approximately $7,000 in livestock to Reinecke. Thcirb was a loss of sleep, as well, for a large number ranchers, law enforcement personnel, EMT and, of course, young calves. Clarkson said that the calves: were re-weaned on Saturday and that things h quieted down, although she and Reinecke were sll z picking up one young fugitive calf that had ma-- aged to make its way as far as downtown Beulah  Sunday. .-. By Monday morning a weary, but relieved Clarka was able to report that all livestock was account e for and that the foremost thought being Bhared b , everyone was a heartfelt gratitude that there hd i been no serious injuries resulting from the melej