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Sundance, Wyoming
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October 17, 2002     The Sundance Times
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Page 3. Thursday, October 17, 2002 "WHERE THE KID GOT HIS NAME" This 'n Ttlat THE RETIRE00 ENT PI00AN EXPERTS GARY WILLIAMS October 17, 1989 Certain public events in our lives defining moments, which are used to measure before and after. In my life, 22, 1963, the day of assassination, was the first such moment freezing itself in I was in Mr. Sprague's English just before lunch when Carr announced over the intercom that Kennedy had I was fourteen years old. Thirteen years ago today such event took place shortly before 5:04 p.m. on Tuesday, October 17, 1989, when I left my office on the 28th floor of the Union Bank building in downtown San Francisco. On the other side of town, at Candlestick Park, crowds had gathered to watch game three of the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland A's. I was headed for the subway to catch the 5:10 train to Berkeley where I was taking a night class. I got into the elevator on the 28th floor and nodded to the half dozen others who were already in the car. The doors closed and the elevator began its descent. Suddenly, without any warning, the elevator began to shudder, swinging violently from side to side. The silent passengers began grabbing at the railings which ran around the center of the car, but before anyone could get a grip, the elevator dropped out from under us. We were free-falling from twenty- eight stories above the ground, no longer bound by the law of gravity. As the car began its free-fall, all six of us began to fly around in space inside the elevator. We were floating like ping penn balls, crashing into each other, everyone yelling at once. Just as suddenly as it had begun to fall, the safety mechanism in the elevator shaft 'caught' and the elevator car jerked to a violent halt, still rattling, but no longer falling. The doors sprung open and all seven of us tumbled out into the hallway of the 15th floor. We had dropped at least five stories before the brakes of the elevator caught and it automatically spat us into the hallway. I stood up and was tossed back Ques :io]] of the' Wee" 000 Jacob Comella It's all about the personalityl Mati Kahler I like a nice guy, but a good body doesn't hurt, either. Heath Baron Looking into their eyes and see- their inner beauty. And kind- & compassion. Robin Gray He's got to know how to treat his girl right. Punk Humphrey The curves, personality, eyes obediencel Abby Denzin He has to be a good driverl down. I imagine the feeling to be similar to that experienced by total numbness in both legs; there was absolutely no muscle control because everything was moving underneath me. I looked up and saw several other people also on the floor, faces fixed in different masks of terror. I remember hearing someone scream that it was an earthquake. And then it stopped. Just as suddenly as it had started it was over. There was that pause where everything is silent and then crowds of people began pouring out of offices, everyone talking at once. There was no power and people began lining up at the exit doors to the stairways. Since no one knew how serious it had been, and there was no way of knowing if aftershocks would occur, causing even more damage, it was imperative for everyone to walk down the staircases and get out of the building immediately. After years of living in San Francisco, where earthquakes are a fact of life, the response to clear the building was almost instinctive. It wasn't until I'd gotten outside that the full impact of what had happened began to sink in. There was an cede silence, almost overwhelming at first, a sudden absence of background noise which is such an integral part of urban living; there was no traffic, no clanging of cable car bells, no din of human voices. Everything was dead calm. It was extremely hot, even at that hour, and there was no breeze at all- -even the air was still. People were clustered in small groups on street comers listening wherever someone happened to have a radio. It's amazing how when the power is out and the emergency is on, there's nothing quite like radio. As I walked to the corner of Califomia and Drumm Streets, I got my first shock when I looked up to see the front of a four-story bank building lying scattered across the entire block. Where moments before someone had been sitting, perhaps using the phone, there were desks wobbling precariously out over the edge of nothing. I found myself wondering if the owner of the desk may be under all those bricks. I heard a gasp from the group of people nearest me. They had just been told that the Bay Bridge had collapsed and that an entire section of the city, the Marina District, was in flames. How bad had it been? Had much of the city been destroyed again, as it had been in 1906? Were my family and friends safe? A thousand thoughts raced through my mind. And do you know what I did? I began to go down to the subway station to take the train to my class in Berkeley! Shock and catastrophe take a while to fully register. Those of us who lived in San Francisco lived there by choice. The knowledge that disaster lurks just below the surface perhaps explains some of. the free-wheeling attitude San Franciscans are known for. One thing is certain; life is a roll of the dice. We speak of fate and we hope for miracles, but mostly it's just blind luck. Too many innocent people died merely because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. As with all tragedies, if you're lucky enough to survive, you look at life with a renewed sense of appreciation. And you never forget your own escape from fate. --Letters to the Editor-- Dear Sir: Ray. Olin B. Chassell (1862-1944), my grandfather, came to Sundance in 1886 and acquired a ranch just west of the city, which he owned until the early 1940s. A man named Law Wayne worked with Grandpa on the ranch for many years. Law and Grandpa argued frequently over the best ways to do tlings, but were very loyal friends. Lew was the one in charge of me during thb summer of 1940 when I worked on the ranch. My family and I plan to visit Sundance this summer, and I would like to pay my respects at the grave of Lew Wayne if any of your readers know where he is buried. My guess is, I would be grateful indeed if he or she would contact me at 145 Pendleton Drive, Athens, Georgia 30606 or by phone at (706) 548-3618. Thank you very much for any assistance your readers can provide. During every election a number of voters choose to use tieir vote by " writing in names such as "Mickey Mouse," "Donald Duck" or =Goofy; Whether those voters do so as a form of political protest or serendipity they, no doubt, are aware that "Mickey Mouse," "Donald Duck" and "Goofy" are not going to become elected officials in Crook County regardless of the number of votes they may garner. ' The Crook County voters are being asked to wdte in Robert Lippman for county attorney in the upcoming election. Wyoming law {W.S. 18-3- 301(a)} requires that counties like Crook County, ',Shall elect a county and prosecuting attorney who at the time of his nomination and election and during his term of office shall be a member of the bar of this state:' I believe that Mr. Lippman is not a member of the bar of this state. I also believe that there is no provision in the rules for admission to the Wyoming State Bar that provides opportunity for Mr. Lippman's admission before February, 2003. In simple terms, I do not believe that Mr. Lippman could lawfully assume the Office of Crook County Attorney even if he received a majority of the valid votes. Perhaps I'm misinformed. If so, I invite Mr. Lippman to provide the public an explanation as to how a vote for him would be substantially different than a vote for one of the above mentioned characters. Sincerely, Bill Rice Dear Sir, The recent town council meeting over the Kaski subdivision and the Legion Hall is to my mind a perfect example of "ale boy government". As one voter, I wish to take the mayor up on his offer to pay the 500 dollar fee for taking down the Legion Hall. I do admire the mayor and council's slight of hand in the offer to extend the city sewer out to that new subdivision. Does any home owner in town have any idea how much our taxes would go up to finance that little boondoggle? I am not a rocket scientist but it's pretty obvious that the town council is stacked with people against the Kaski subdivision. I would not be so crass as to suggest that if the subdivision is developed in 8, way to benefit any council member that it might be greased through with little comment. Maybe Mr. Kaski should contact the owners of other subdivisions around town and ask how they managed to get under the radar. I believe as a public service The Sundance Times should publish all the Sundance town ordinances so the public could sea what the reason is for delaying approval of the Kaski subdivision. Harold Crawl Letter to the Editor: After much consideration and after some ridiculous letters to the editor, I decided to write one. This is my own opinion, and from what I gather, many others' opinion as well. We must thank anyone and everyone that wiU step up and will try to keep us out of war. We have so many Congressmen that do not possess the intestinal fortitude to stand on their own feet. Do intelligent people really believe that Iraq is a threat to us? I read of a discussion of college professors on the Iraq situation. It was a unanimous decision that it was for financial gain. Very much like our other wars and skirmishes. You take the profits out of war and there would be none. Our economy is in no condition for war thanks to NAFTA and GATT and now trade on a fast track. We have many problems at home. Our borders are wide open and should be guarded much closer. Thismust not be neglected. So many of our good jobs have shifted to areas of cheap labor. We have been an industrial nation to be proud of. The good jobs of the middle class have disappeared, the ones that fed our govemment coffers. Foreclosures are at an all-time high. This is not counting the 80s. Interest cuts have not helped the economy, just hurt the ones that try to make a few cents on investment. We never get a good picture of the news, just what we are supposed to hear. Some opinions remind me of a story of a dude on a dude ranch preparing for a horseback trail ride. He was mounted, a wrangler said, "You are backwards in the saddle." The dude's haughty answer was, "You don't know which way I am going." Thank you. T.K. Glover Everett E. Burgeson Investment Representative Edward Jones 120 W. Hudson P.O. Box 158 Spearfish, SD 57783-1058 Bus 605-642-5778 Fax 605-642-5779 Hm 605-642-7875 800-233-4745 Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 Halloween Costume Pare 00baturba00, 00ct. 2(5 # 9:00pm-I :OOam CAP'T RON'S RODEO BAR .... H.U.Le.TT,.. .... 1 = - $50 gift cert. Corner Market 2 "b - 2 T-BOne dinners 1 st Gold 3'* - 2 dinners Mineral Palace II 4 - 12 pack of Beer covE/00 cHARq00! To the Taxpayers of Crook County: My name is Brad Buescher. My wife and I moved to Crook County from Nebraska in May of 2001 to work for the Crook County Sheriff's Office/Prir to moving I was a Deputy Sheriff in the State of Nebraska for approximately six years. My wife and I came to Crook County with high hopes of settling in this beautiful area that you call home. However, in late Augnst, I quit the Sheriff's Office. In my entire adult life, I do not recall ever-walking out on a job, that is, until now. I found the lack of professionalism I witnessed from the current administration very troubling and believe the taxpayers are entitled to know. Sheriff Stahla instills a very negative atmosphere to work in. The employees are often treated with disrespect and disti'ust. The arrogance and lack of leadersNp displayed by Stahla and UndersheriffAdams reflect greadL!] the }work environment at the office. With the astronomical turnover rate this should come as no lu-lserrOan1xxty. Outside agency relationships are no different. Members from every police department in the county (including two Chiefs of Police) and Highway Patrol signed the petition for Steve Coach to run for Sheriff. Furthermore, if you were to drive across the county you would fmd campaign signs for Mr. Couch in the vast majority of the officers' yards. Does this not send a message? No administration is perfect, nor did I expect that. ' However, I did not expect what I saw either. There is currently a great group of employees at the Sheriff's Office. In my humble opinion, I believe you would be doing them and yourselves all a great service by voting in a new administration. --Brad Buescher PAID FOR BY CITIZENS TO ELECT STEVE COUCH "Jake, quR foolin' around and hand me that wmnchl" Sundance State Bank" Phone 283.1074 Page 3. Thursday, October 17, 2002 "WHERE THE KID GOT HIS NAME" This 'n Ttlat THE RETIRE00 ENT PI00AN EXPERTS GARY WILLIAMS October 17, 1989 Certain public events in our lives defining moments, which are used to measure before and after. In my life, 22, 1963, the day of assassination, was the first such moment freezing itself in I was in Mr. Sprague's English just before lunch when Carr announced over the intercom that Kennedy had I was fourteen years old. Thirteen years ago today such event took place shortly before 5:04 p.m. on Tuesday, October 17, 1989, when I left my office on the 28th floor of the Union Bank building in downtown San Francisco. On the other side of town, at Candlestick Park, crowds had gathered to watch game three of the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland A's. I was headed for the subway to catch the 5:10 train to Berkeley where I was taking a night class. I got into the elevator on the 28th floor and nodded to the half dozen others who were already in the car. The doors closed and the elevator began its descent. Suddenly, without any warning, the elevator began to shudder, swinging violently from side to side. The silent passengers began grabbing at the railings which ran around the center of the car, but before anyone could get a grip, the elevator dropped out from under us. We were free-falling from twenty- eight stories above the ground, no longer bound by the law of gravity. As the car began its free-fall, all six of us began to fly around in space inside the elevator. We were floating like ping penn balls, crashing into each other, everyone yelling at once. Just as suddenly as it had begun to fall, the safety mechanism in the elevator shaft 'caught' and the elevator car jerked to a violent halt, still rattling, but no longer falling. The doors sprung open and all seven of us tumbled out into the hallway of the 15th floor. We had dropped at least five stories before the brakes of the elevator caught and it automatically spat us into the hallway. I stood up and was tossed back Ques :io]] of the' Wee" 000 Jacob Comella It's all about the personalityl Mati Kahler I like a nice guy, but a good body doesn't hurt, either. Heath Baron Looking into their eyes and see- their inner beauty. And kind- & compassion. Robin Gray He's got to know how to treat his girl right. Punk Humphrey The curves, personality, eyes obediencel Abby Denzin He has to be a good driverl down. I imagine the feeling to be similar to that experienced by total numbness in both legs; there was absolutely no muscle control because everything was moving underneath me. I looked up and saw several other people also on the floor, faces fixed in different masks of terror. I remember hearing someone scream that it was an earthquake. And then it stopped. Just as suddenly as it had started it was over. There was that pause where everything is silent and then crowds of people began pouring out of offices, everyone talking at once. There was no power and people began lining up at the exit doors to the stairways. Since no one knew how serious it had been, and there was no way of knowing if aftershocks would occur, causing even more damage, it was imperative for everyone to walk down the staircases and get out of the building immediately. After years of living in San Francisco, where earthquakes are a fact of life, the response to clear the building was almost instinctive. It wasn't until I'd gotten outside that the full impact of what had happened began to sink in. There was an cede silence, almost overwhelming at first, a sudden absence of background noise which is such an integral part of urban living; there was no traffic, no clanging of cable car bells, no din of human voices. Everything was dead calm. It was extremely hot, even at that hour, and there was no breeze at all- -even the air was still. People were clustered in small groups on street comers listening wherever someone happened to have a radio. It's amazing how when the power is out and the emergency is on, there's nothing quite like radio. As I walked to the corner of Califomia and Drumm Streets, I got my first shock when I looked up to see the front of a four-story bank building lying scattered across the entire block. Where moments before someone had been sitting, perhaps using the phone, there were desks wobbling precariously out over the edge of nothing. I found myself wondering if the owner of the desk may be under all those bricks. I heard a gasp from the group of people nearest me. They had just been told that the Bay Bridge had collapsed and that an entire section of the city, the Marina District, was in flames. How bad had it been? Had much of the city been destroyed again, as it had been in 1906? Were my family and friends safe? A thousand thoughts raced through my mind. And do you know what I did? I began to go down to the subway station to take the train to my class in Berkeley! Shock and catastrophe take a while to fully register. Those of us who lived in San Francisco lived there by choice. The knowledge that disaster lurks just below the surface perhaps explains some of. the free-wheeling attitude San Franciscans are known for. One thing is certain; life is a roll of the dice. We speak of fate and we hope for miracles, but mostly it's just blind luck. Too many innocent people died merely because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. As with all tragedies, if you're lucky enough to survive, you look at life with a renewed sense of appreciation. And you never forget your own escape from fate. --Letters to the Editor-- Dear Sir: Ray. Olin B. Chassell (1862-1944), my grandfather, came to Sundance in 1886 and acquired a ranch just west of the city, which he owned until the early 1940s. A man named Law Wayne worked with Grandpa on the ranch for many years. Law and Grandpa argued frequently over the best ways to do tlings, but were very loyal friends. Lew was the one in charge of me during thb summer of 1940 when I worked on the ranch. My family and I plan to visit Sundance this summer, and I would like to pay my respects at the grave of Lew Wayne if any of your readers know where he is buried. My guess is, I would be grateful indeed if he or she would contact me at 145 Pendleton Drive, Athens, Georgia 30606 or by phone at (706) 548-3618. Thank you very much for any assistance your readers can provide. During every election a number of voters choose to use tieir vote by " writing in names such as "Mickey Mouse," "Donald Duck" or =Goofy; Whether those voters do so as a form of political protest or serendipity they, no doubt, are aware that "Mickey Mouse," "Donald Duck" and "Goofy" are not going to become elected officials in Crook County regardless of the number of votes they may garner. ' The Crook County voters are being asked to wdte in Robert Lippman for county attorney in the upcoming election. Wyoming law {W.S. 18-3- 301(a)} requires that counties like Crook County, ',Shall elect a county and prosecuting attorney who at the time of his nomination and election and during his term of office shall be a member of the bar of this state:' I believe that Mr. Lippman is not a member of the bar of this state. I also believe that there is no provision in the rules for admission to the Wyoming State Bar that provides opportunity for Mr. Lippman's admission before February, 2003. In simple terms, I do not believe that Mr. Lippman could lawfully assume the Office of Crook County Attorney even if he received a majority of the valid votes. Perhaps I'm misinformed. If so, I invite Mr. Lippman to provide the public an explanation as to how a vote for him would be substantially different than a vote for one of the above mentioned characters. Sincerely, Bill Rice Dear Sir, The recent town council meeting over the Kaski subdivision and the Legion Hall is to my mind a perfect example of "ale boy government". As one voter, I wish to take the mayor up on his offer to pay the 500 dollar fee for taking down the Legion Hall. I do admire the mayor and council's slight of hand in the offer to extend the city sewer out to that new subdivision. Does any home owner in town have any idea how much our taxes would go up to finance that little boondoggle? I am not a rocket scientist but it's pretty obvious that the town council is stacked with people against the Kaski subdivision. I would not be so crass as to suggest that if the subdivision is developed in 8, way to benefit any council member that it might be greased through with little comment. Maybe Mr. Kaski should contact the owners of other subdivisions around town and ask how they managed to get under the radar. I believe as a public service The Sundance Times should publish all the Sundance town ordinances so the public could sea what the reason is for delaying approval of the Kaski subdivision. Harold Crawl Letter to the Editor: After much consideration and after some ridiculous letters to the editor, I decided to write one. This is my own opinion, and from what I gather, many others' opinion as well. We must thank anyone and everyone that wiU step up and will try to keep us out of war. We have so many Congressmen that do not possess the intestinal fortitude to stand on their own feet. Do intelligent people really believe that Iraq is a threat to us? I read of a discussion of college professors on the Iraq situation. It was a unanimous decision that it was for financial gain. Very much like our other wars and skirmishes. You take the profits out of war and there would be none. Our economy is in no condition for war thanks to NAFTA and GATT and now trade on a fast track. We have many problems at home. Our borders are wide open and should be guarded much closer. Thismust not be neglected. So many of our good jobs have shifted to areas of cheap labor. We have been an industrial nation to be proud of. The good jobs of the middle class have disappeared, the ones that fed our govemment coffers. Foreclosures are at an all-time high. This is not counting the 80s. Interest cuts have not helped the economy, just hurt the ones that try to make a few cents on investment. We never get a good picture of the news, just what we are supposed to hear. Some opinions remind me of a story of a dude on a dude ranch preparing for a horseback trail ride. He was mounted, a wrangler said, "You are backwards in the saddle." The dude's haughty answer was, "You don't know which way I am going." Thank you. T.K. Glover Everett E. Burgeson Investment Representative Edward Jones 120 W. Hudson P.O. Box 158 Spearfish, SD 57783-1058 Bus 605-642-5778 Fax 605-642-5779 Hm 605-642-7875 800-233-4745 Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 Halloween Costume Pare 00baturba00, 00ct. 2(5 # 9:00pm-I :OOam CAP'T RON'S RODEO BAR .... H.U.Le.TT,.. .... 1 = - $50 gift cert. Corner Market 2 "b - 2 T-BOne dinners 1 st Gold 3'* - 2 dinners Mineral Palace II 4 - 12 pack of Beer covE/00 cHARq00! To the Taxpayers of Crook County: My name is Brad Buescher. My wife and I moved to Crook County from Nebraska in May of 2001 to work for the Crook County Sheriff's Office/Prir to moving I was a Deputy Sheriff in the State of Nebraska for approximately six years. My wife and I came to Crook County with high hopes of settling in this beautiful area that you call home. However, in late Augnst, I quit the Sheriff's Office. In my entire adult life, I do not recall ever-walking out on a job, that is, until now. I found the lack of professionalism I witnessed from the current administration very troubling and believe the taxpayers are entitled to know. Sheriff Stahla instills a very negative atmosphere to work in. The employees are often treated with disrespect and disti'ust. The arrogance and lack of leadersNp displayed by Stahla and UndersheriffAdams reflect greadL!] the }work environment at the office. With the astronomical turnover rate this should come as no lu-lserrOan1xxty. Outside agency relationships are no different. Members from every police department in the county (including two Chiefs of Police) and Highway Patrol signed the petition for Steve Coach to run for Sheriff. Furthermore, if you were to drive across the county you would fmd campaign signs for Mr. Couch in the vast majority of the officers' yards. Does this not send a message? No administration is perfect, nor did I expect that. ' However, I did not expect what I saw either. There is currently a great group of employees at the Sheriff's Office. In my humble opinion, I believe you would be doing them and yourselves all a great service by voting in a new administration. --Brad Buescher PAID FOR BY CITIZENS TO ELECT STEVE COUCH "Jake, quR foolin' around and hand me that wmnchl" Sundance State Bank" Phone 283.1074