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Sundance, Wyoming
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October 17, 2002     The Sundance Times
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7- Thursday, October 17, 2002 "WHERE THE KID GOT HIS NAME" nter weather awareness The "Zipper" Boot to be October 14-18 the past twelve years the Wyoming Emergeucy Management tile National Weather Service and the American Red Cross of have joined together with out7 news organizations to save lives by disseminating information to be used by individu- in protecting themselves from possible inck:mcnt weather. think most of us in Wyoming know ]low to prepare, hut we pro- and it's a good idea to remind each other that winter's just the corner and we don't want to get caught unprepared," stated County Emergency Management Coordi)mtor Veronica Canfield week. of the information released this week inehldcd the following: Vehicle Safety Plan your trip! Check weather reports t(> avoid storms. Call Somebody! Tell someone where yogi are gofllg and when you to arrive. If weather is bad--Delay your trip! Gas tank should always be over half futl. Kit Battery operated flashlight Battery operated radio Extra batteries Booster cables Blankets or sleeping bag, extra clothing First aid kit and manual Non-perishable, high energy food Bottled water Maps Shovel Signal flares, matches Can opener, utility knife Tire repair kit Fire extinguisher Bright colored signal cloth (for antenna) You Are Stuck In Your Car Do NOT set out on foot, distance can be velw deceiving! Conserve fnel by running engine/healer about tell tnintltes each for warm th. Crack window slightly to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, keep clear. Keep warm, use maps, floormats, seat cov('rs, anything for insu- and blankets. Put something bright on your antenna and use dome light so you be seen. This Week At Your Library JILL MACKEY BOOK DISCUSSION will be meeting for the time this Thursday, Oc- 'her 17 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss Son" by Richard Wright. zone is welcome to attend, if you haven't read the ok or didn't care for the The Hulett Discussion has already met for the time and had quite an in- discussion regarding book, so we are looking for- to our meeting here. ase join US! Programming: out our TEEN READ activities, including ar .COFFEE HOUSE Friday, October 25 at 00 pm. Relax with your share some music or talent. And what do think about a TEEN ADV1 Y BOARD- any volun- ??? CHILDREN'S HALLOWEEN Monday, October 28, ):00-7:00 p.m. MOTHER GOOSE STORYTIME, ts, 11:00 a.m., stories fun for toddlers and pre- hoolers. HUMANITIES PRO- Fi-iday, November 1, :00 p.m., "Memories World War II" by Val Bur- lqew Fiction: CRUSADER by Max Brand. didn't want to be a tamp/on boxer and drifted in- end into a life of drunken- ess and crime, culminating in theft of the great stallion, THE HEALER by Dee erlderson. Fifth in the 'Malley series features O'Malley, a trauma psy- lologist on assignment, coax-- flood victims to safety, in- a murder, and help- the aftermath of a school )oting. DANGER IN THE by Dee Henderson. uel to the O'Malley series. is haunted by a nameless, man who abducted her ago and continues to her life. THE VOYAGE THE JERLE SHANNARA: by Terry Brooks. [th the armies of darkness against the rapidly seeks hit run vehicle 0ri October 7, 2002, the Crook Sheriff's office received of a damaged fence at the of Hwy 14 and Warren Road. Investigation shows sometime after 2:00 a.m. a failed to stop at the stop at the end of Warren Peak crossed Hwy 14 and went state and private property Several 8" wooden fence and a State Highway sign were destroyed and other the property was done. vehicle involved should have front end damage. If has any information about tlnreported accident, please eriff's office at 283-1225. dwindling members of the Jerle Shannara, the last stand be- tween good and evil begins-- New Nonfiction: WYOMING'S SNAKF RIVER by Verne Huser. A river guide's chronicle of people and places, plants and animals, including a mile-by mile rivet" log from Yellowstone National Park to the Palisades Reservoir. THE STRUGGLE FOR APACHERIA, Volume one of Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865-1890 by Peter Cozzens. THE WARS FOR THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, Vol- ume two of Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865- 1890 by Pe- ter Cozzens. WRITERS ON THE RANGE, edited by Karl Hess Jr. and John A. Baden. Western writers exploring the changing face of the American West. New Young Adult: STARGIRL by ,Jerry Spinelli, a Soaring Eagle Book Award nominee. In this story about the perils of popularity, the courage of nonconformity, and the thrill of first love, an ec- centric student named Stargirl changesMica High School for- ever. Junior Fiction: WHISTLER IN THE DARK by Kathleen Ernst. In 1867, 12- year-old Emma and her wid- owed mother move to a tiny mining town in Colorado Terri- tory to start a newspaper, but someone is determined to scare them away. TttE KILLER UNDERPANTS by Michael Lawrence. Jiggy has a devil of a time with a new pair of un- derwear that refuses to be re- moved and which, when they start rippling and itching, cause strange things to hap- pen. Junior Nonfiction: DINOSAURS, a National Geo- graphic book by Paul Barrett. Detailed dinosaur profiles, fos- sils and reconstructions, fact files, size comparison charts, and world locator maps. WEATHER, an Eyewitness book by Brian Cosgrove. Discover the world's weather-- see, learn, and discover why it rains, where you might see a tornado, where was the biggest hailstone, what are different kinds of clouds. Picture books: LITTLE BADGER'S JUST- ABOUT BIRTHDAY by Eve Bunting. At his own 'just- about' birthday party, Little Badger discovers that his friends have birthdays at just about the same time as his. EDWARD IN THE JUNGLE by David McPhail. Edward loves to read about Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, and one afternoon he becomes so absorbed in his book that he finds himself deep in Tarzan's jungle. CLASSIFIEDS[ SELLi!! J By MARY JEAN WILSON Did you know that the trademark, "Zipper", originally referred to a rub- ber boot that had a slide fastener? The B F Goodrich company gave that name to rubber boots with slide fas- teners in 1923. The name soon came to refer to the slide fastener and the ease with which it opened and closed. The first of several inventions or discoveries to make a huge differ- ence in the world of fashion was named a National Medal of Science winner in 1891. Two years later, in 1893, Whitcomb L. Judson, Chicago, patented the device for which he had received the medal. Judson's slide fastener used a system of hooks and eyes. Col. Lewis' Walker brought out an improved version using meshed teeth in 1913. A hooMess meshed tooth slide fastener was patented by Gideon Sundback in 1917. These early slide fasteners were metal and were primarily used for small items such as purses and pouches, gloves and things like the pockets of flying suits. In 1937 the DuPont Laboratories were awarded the National Medal of Science for the discovery of nylon. Although nylon was primarily used as a fiber in women's stockings and in fabric for things like parachutes at first, it soon became clear that it had many other uses. One of these Circuit Court Speeding Shauna R. Hanson, Gillette, 83/75, $85; James L. Hahn, Oshoto, 73/651 $64; Wayne S. Petersen, Sundance, 84/65, $87; William B. Leasure, AR, 96/75, $200; Ryan J. Renken, Gillette, 79/65, $72; Matthew Blake Levy, DE, 92/75, $210; Tony R. Olson, SD, 87/75, $110; David Bralins Sanders, OR, 93/75, $200; Chris P. Garro, SD, 86/75, $100; Karen A. Gruner, CO, 78/65, $69; Amanda E. Ball, IA, 83/75, $85; Jennifer M. Buchanan, Newcastle, 78/65, $69; David C. Sibery, IL, 85/75, $95; James J. Wilding, Jr., PA, 85/75, $95; Roanna M. Clifford, SD, 82/75, $80; Richard K. Burns, Gillette, 83/75, $85; Ashley T. Frond, Gillette, 86/75, $100; Jeremiah J. Bonnema, Newcastle, 75/65, $60; Roberta A. Legner, Sundance, 84/75, $90; Carson C. Talago, OH, 86/75, $100; Humberto Martinez, Gillette, 90/75, $200; Roberta S. Romstad, MT, 84/75, $90; Jacquelyn Deeoster, CO, 95/75, $200; Douglas W. Shepherd, PA, 88/75, $I20; Daniel M. Sullivan, MA, 101-109/75, $230; Steven E. Jackson, ID, 86/75, $100; Bobbi Dee Huxtable, SD, 84/75, $90; Manfred Berenbrinker, NE, 75/65, $60; Lynn M. Bachand, SD, 84/75, $90; Dennis Weinberger, Calgary, AB, 89/75, $200. Exceeding 36-55mph in urban Michael Christopher Nevans, MN, $112; Vincent Racalbuto, CA, $140.00. Superintendent's zone 25+mph Jon B. Jeffries, IN, $230.00. was in the making of zippers. Since a zipper is composed of two toothed tracks, attached to two fac- ing edges of fabric, and opened or closed by an attached slider between the tracks, it is ideal for use in mak- ing clothing. The fashion world soon took advantage of this, using zippers of all kinds in the clothing that was put on the market. Since the 1930s the use of zippers has become wide- spread. Many of the zippers in use today are made of nylon. These zippers can be made with large or small teeth and usually operate more smoothly that metal zippers. In 1948 another National Medal of Science was awarded for another device that now plays a large part in the making of certain kinds of cloth- ing as well as having other uses. That award went to de Mestral, a Swiss, for his discovery ofVelcro. Velcm re- lies on a series of nylon hooks that adhere to the surface of a special pile to hold things together. It is used extensively in shoes and other items for the use of people who have difficulty with other types of fasten- ers. Before the advent of the zipper, people had little choice of fasteners for clothes other than buttons, snaps and hooks. The zipper and other associated discoveries opened the way to a much wider range of fashions than had been possible before. Exceeding 26-44mph School Zone Matthew d. Brescia, CT, $108.00. Violation Rule or Reg Nightime Arnold L. Blackledge, Gillette, $210.00. Fail to stop dt Port of Entry Barry E. McCollam, OR, $I i0; Bobby A. Reece, Van Tassell, WY, $110.00. 395,8fi Log Book not Current Sherwood H. Gaunt, NJ, $160. Annual Reglstration/Veh Rickey E. Warren, MS, $60.00. Oper w/no permiss/permlt- night Leslie B. Kell, Winnipeg, MB, $21o.oo. 39S.3ai lO-Hour Violation Michael T. Brannon, AL, $160. Motor Carrier Safety Regs. Bernard Brusseau, SD, $160; Bernard Brusseau, SD, $160. Exhibition of Acceleration Guy C. Calonge, Gillette, $60. Trucks 84 in 7S Bartlomie J. Wozny, MI, $190 Operation/Towboats  >: Tom Hurley, Gillette, $60. 392.5 Alcohol Detected in Syst Kelly G. Hardisty, IA, $160. City Court Speeding Christine C. Flohr, Longrnont, CO, 40/30, $90; Melissa Holland, Se- attle, WA, 45/30, $120; Allen K. Fitzsimmons, Omaha, NE, 47/30, $128; Chad J. Slaney, Ft. Attdnson, WI, 28/20, $60; Dorothy Gaspersowich, Shohomish, WA, 27/ 20, $60; John A. Margrof, Sarasota, FL, 39/30, $96; Odean F. Olson, Rapid City r SD r 43/30 t $112.00. NOTICE e The regularly scheduled Thursday, October 17, 2002, school board meeting has been changed to: Tuesday, October 22, 2002 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. in Moorcroft at Moorcroft Secondary. Board of Trustees Crook County School Distdct Hal Bowles, Chairman Publish: October 17, 2002 IIAI00 for School Board lio'llBuiltlonlt Please take a minu/e to become aequaintad with one of the candidatea /of Crook CcceTly Boo/ Boa." Frank Harr has been a Crook County resident for over 10 years, residing in the Carllle area. He is married with three children. His wife, Melony, is a nurse, and is the Director of Frontier Home Health in Sundance. He is father to April and Justin, both Moorcroft High School graduates, and Moorcroft Elementary 6th grader, Cheyenne. Frank has been an active member of Moorcroft Chamber of Commerce. He has participated in Wyoming Business Council affairs, and has been a supportive member of the community. Frank built, opened and then operated the Moorcroft Subway for three years, where he employed numerous high-schoolers and became aware of their strengths, needs and weaknesses as employees. Frank Harr believes that not all graduates are meant to go on to college, but those that do should be educationally prepared. For those i who would like to choose a vocational occupation, there is a need to expose those students to the various careers available to them before they graduate. Your vote for FRANK HARR for Crook County School Board will be greatly appreciated. Paid for by Frank DID YOU KNOW? For every one of our 5887 men, women and children in Crook County: --The mineral industry mill levy pays $486.02 --The public utilities mill levy pays $53.97 per person --The Iocaly assessed property pays $239.96 per person One of the tasks of the Crook County Commissioners is to administer these tax dollars on your behalf. I am qualified to handle this position. PA TR I CIA A . FR OLANDER FOR COMMISSIONER Paid for by Patricia A. Frolander , FOR )CROOK C SHERI T November 5, 2002 Goals Restore stability in the Sheriff's Office through hiring and keeping good employees-- end turnover Re-establish working relations with other agencies: Local Police Departments Fire Department EMS State Law Enforcement Re-establish involvement with the youth of our community through interaction and education programs , , -Be a working Sheriff-- stay in touch with the citizkoCu/ :*Be a Shedff frkeQle- h- mograp y Experience Began Law Enforcement Career in Crook , Born tn Belie Fourche, 1961 County 1990 Grew up in Belle Fourche .=Detention Officer Certified =Associates Degree =Peace Officer Certified Wife Gabdel First Line Supervisor Trained =Son Grog, 21 =-Training Officer Certified =Crook County Resident since 1988 Over 1300 Hours of P.O.S.T Certified ' PAID FOR BY CITIZENS TO ELECT STEVE COUCH Seniority 8 yrs. Co. Commission 8 yrs. State Senate Stabilize Size of State Government Preserve Private Property Rights, Individuals' Freedom of Choice Fair Funding for Small Schools & Small Towns Increase Wyo. Water Storage & Utilization Improve & Expand State Transportation Served 8 yrs. Senate Agriculture & Natural Resource Committee, 7 yrs. Select Water, 4 yrs. Chairman Senate Transportation and Highways, ad-hoc State Forestry, & N.E. Wyo. Water Basin Advisory Committee. Re-elect Bill Barton State Senator Paid for by Bill Barton for State Senator Re-elect District 1 HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Including: Komatsu track dozer, 14E & 14 Cat motor graders, Case loader, 2-Ford backhoes, Ford loader, Cat rubber tired dozer, White Western star Dump truck IHC Cab over Semi, Fontain 48' Drop deck Trailer; Wilson straigth stock trailer, White dump truck; Langland 18' goose neck trailer; GMC stock truck, Ford dump truck and more. VEHICLES, AWe, TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT: 1986 Chevy & GMC 1 ton pickups w/ flatbeds, Ford F150 pickup; 3 Honda 300 & 250 Fourtrax four wheelers, Ford 800 Tractor, Kubota L-225 Diesel utility tractor, w/pto tiller, JD rotary mower, Lincoln Town Car, Ford 4x4 stepside pickup, Astro Mini van, Asst. farm machinery. 47-FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION The entire Dick Mader Collection: SHOTGUNS by Browning, Winchester, Remington, Sears, Coast To Coast, Springfield, Ithaca, Stevens, Mossberg, Glanfield, RIFLES by Remington, Ruger, Winchester, Savage, Marlin, Stevens, HANDGUNS by Ruger, Jennings, Raven, Smith & Wesson, Beretta, Davis, Tauler Military & Police, Luger, Walther, High Standard, Guemica Espania, Colt, and others Huge Supply of AMMUNITION AND ACC. BUILDINGS, SHEDS 8, TANKS: 26 Buildings & sheds to be removed from proparty, also propane & fuel tanks. FULL LINE OF TOOLS & SHOP ITEMS, HARDWARE, PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL, COLLECTABLE, HOUSEHOLD & MISC: Auctloneere Note: This is the last of three large auctions scheduled to market the vast holdings of long-time Campbell County resident, R.A. "Dick" Mader. We have certainly saved the best for last! Dick was a well known and respected Auctioneer, Real Estate Broker and Rancher in the region and collected many interesting and useful items. This is a partial listing only of literally thousands of items to be sold. Truly something here for everyone, plan to spend both enjoyable days with us on the beautiful Mader Ranch. We are honored the Mader family chose our firm to conduct Dick's Auctions. Sale Order: Words cannot dascdba the large quantity of property to be sold; you simply must see it to believe ill Selling Friday: Tools and shop items, Hardware, plumbing, electrical, collectibles and household, build[ and amino, heavy equipment, vehicle,, ill A,D _ www.bradeenauction.com R. A. "Dick" Mader Estate Kelly Mader, Peonal Representative 605-673-2629 GIIletta Wyoming i Ron Bradeen Broker/Auctioneer 7- Thursday, October 17, 2002 "WHERE THE KID GOT HIS NAME" nter weather awareness The "Zipper" Boot to be October 14-18 the past twelve years the Wyoming Emergeucy Management tile National Weather Service and the American Red Cross of have joined together with out7 news organizations to save lives by disseminating information to be used by individu- in protecting themselves from possible inck:mcnt weather. think most of us in Wyoming know ]low to prepare, hut we pro- and it's a good idea to remind each other that winter's just the corner and we don't want to get caught unprepared," stated County Emergency Management Coordi)mtor Veronica Canfield week. of the information released this week inehldcd the following: Vehicle Safety Plan your trip! Check weather reports t(> avoid storms. Call Somebody! Tell someone where yogi are gofllg and when you to arrive. If weather is bad--Delay your trip! Gas tank should always be over half futl. Kit Battery operated flashlight Battery operated radio Extra batteries Booster cables Blankets or sleeping bag, extra clothing First aid kit and manual Non-perishable, high energy food Bottled water Maps Shovel Signal flares, matches Can opener, utility knife Tire repair kit Fire extinguisher Bright colored signal cloth (for antenna) You Are Stuck In Your Car Do NOT set out on foot, distance can be velw deceiving! Conserve fnel by running engine/healer about tell tnintltes each for warm th. Crack window slightly to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, keep clear. Keep warm, use maps, floormats, seat cov('rs, anything for insu- and blankets. Put something bright on your antenna and use dome light so you be seen. This Week At Your Library JILL MACKEY BOOK DISCUSSION will be meeting for the time this Thursday, Oc- 'her 17 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss Son" by Richard Wright. zone is welcome to attend, if you haven't read the ok or didn't care for the The Hulett Discussion has already met for the time and had quite an in- discussion regarding book, so we are looking for- to our meeting here. ase join US! Programming: out our TEEN READ activities, including ar .COFFEE HOUSE Friday, October 25 at 00 p m. Relax with your share some music or talent. And what do think about a TEEN ADV1 Y BOARD- any volun- ??? CHILDREN'S HALLOWEEN Monday, October 28, ):00-7:00 p.m. MOTHER GOOSE STORYTIME, ts, 11:00 a.m., stories fun for toddlers and pre- hoolers. HUMANITIES PRO- Fi-iday, November 1, :00 p.m., "Memories World War II" by Val Bur- lqew Fiction: CRUSADER by Max Brand. didn't want to be a tamp/on boxer and drifted in- end into a life of drunken- ess and crime, culminating in theft of the great stallion, THE HEALER by Dee erlderson. Fifth in the 'Malley series features O'Malley, a trauma psy- lologist on assignment, coax-- flood victims to safety, in- a murder, and help- the aftermath of a school )oting. DANGER IN THE by Dee Henderson. uel to the O'Malley series. is haunted by a nameless, man who abducted her ago and continues to her life. THE VOYAGE THE JERLE SHANNARA: by Terry Brooks. [th the armies of darkness against the rapidly seeks hit run vehicle 0ri October 7, 2002, the Crook Sheriff's office received of a damaged fence at the of Hwy 14 and Warren Road. Investigation shows sometime after 2:00 a.m. a failed to stop at the stop at the end of Warren Peak crossed Hwy 14 and went state and private property Several 8" wooden fence and a State Highway sign were destroyed and other the property was done. vehicle involved should have front end damage. If has any information about tlnreported accident, please eriff's office at 283-1225. dwindling members of the Jerle Shannara, the last stand be- tween good and evil begins-- New Nonfiction: WYOMING'S SNAKF RIVER by Verne Huser. A river guide's chronicle of people and places, plants and animals, including a mile-by mile rivet" log from Yellowstone National Park to the Palisades Reservoir. THE STRUGGLE FOR APACHERIA, Volume one of Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865-1890 by Peter Cozzens. THE WARS FOR THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST, Vol- ume two of Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars, 1865- 1890 by Pe- ter Cozzens. WRITERS ON THE RANGE, edited by Karl Hess Jr. and John A. Baden. Western writers exploring the changing face of the American West. New Young Adult: STARGIRL by ,Jerry Spinelli, a Soaring Eagle Book Award nominee. In this story about the perils of popularity, the courage of nonconformity, and the thrill of first love, an ec- centric student named Stargirl changesMica High School for- ever. Junior Fiction: WHISTLER IN THE DARK by Kathleen Ernst. In 1867, 12- year-old Emma and her wid- owed mother move to a tiny mining town in Colorado Terri- tory to start a newspaper, but someone is determined to scare them away. TttE KILLER UNDERPANTS by Michael Lawrence. Jiggy has a devil of a time with a new pair of un- derwear that refuses to be re- moved and which, when they start rippling and itching, cause strange things to hap- pen. Junior Nonfiction: DINOSAURS, a National Geo- graphic book by Paul Barrett. Detailed dinosaur profiles, fos- sils and reconstructions, fact files, size comparison charts, and world locator maps. WEATHER, an Eyewitness book by Brian Cosgrove. Discover the world's weather-- see, learn, and discover why it rains, where you might see a tornado, where was the biggest hailstone, what are different kinds of clouds. Picture books: LITTLE BADGER'S JUST- ABOUT BIRTHDAY by Eve Bunting. At his own 'just- about' birthday party, Little Badger discovers that his friends have birthdays at just about the same time as his. EDWARD IN THE JUNGLE by David McPhail. Edward loves to read about Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle, and one afternoon he becomes so absorbed in his book that he finds himself deep in Tarzan's jungle. CLASSIFIEDS[ SELLi!! J By MARY JEAN WILSON Did you know that the trademark, "Zipper", originally referred to a rub- ber boot that had a slide fastener? The B F Goodrich company gave that name to rubber boots with slide fas- teners in 1923. The name soon came to refer to the slide fastener and the ease with which it opened and closed. The first of several inventions or discoveries to make a huge differ- ence in the world of fashion was named a National Medal of Science winner in 1891. Two years later, in 1893, Whitcomb L. Judson, Chicago, patented the device for which he had received the medal. Judson's slide fastener used a system of hooks and eyes. Col. Lewis' Walker brought out an improved version using meshed teeth in 1913. A hooMess meshed tooth slide fastener was patented by Gideon Sundback in 1917. These early slide fasteners were metal and were primarily used for small items such as purses and pouches, gloves and things like the pockets of flying suits. In 1937 the DuPont Laboratories were awarded the National Medal of Science for the discovery of nylon. Although nylon was primarily used as a fiber in women's stockings and in fabric for things like parachutes at first, it soon became clear that it had many other uses. One of these Circuit Court Speeding Shauna R. Hanson, Gillette, 83/75, $85; James L. Hahn, Oshoto, 73/651 $64; Wayne S. Petersen, Sundance, 84/65, $87; William B. Leasure, AR, 96/75, $200; Ryan J. Renken, Gillette, 79/65, $72; Matthew Blake Levy, DE, 92/75, $210; Tony R. Olson, SD, 87/75, $110; David Bralins Sanders, OR, 93/75, $200; Chris P. Garro, SD, 86/75, $100; Karen A. Gruner, CO, 78/65, $69; Amanda E. Ball, IA, 83/75, $85; Jennifer M. Buchanan, Newcastle, 78/65, $69; David C. Sibery, IL, 85/75, $95; James J. Wilding, Jr., PA, 85/75, $95; Roanna M. Clifford, SD, 82/75, $80; Richard K. Burns, Gillette, 83/75, $85; Ashley T. Frond, Gillette, 86/75, $100; Jeremiah J. Bonnema, Newcastle, 75/65, $60; Roberta A. Legner, Sundance, 84/75, $90; Carson C. Talago, OH, 86/75, $100; Humberto Martinez, Gillette, 90/75, $200; Roberta S. Romstad, MT, 84/75, $90; Jacquelyn Deeoster, CO, 95/75, $200; Douglas W. Shepherd, PA, 88/75, $I20; Daniel M. Sullivan, MA, 101-109/75, $230; Steven E. Jackson, ID, 86/75, $100; Bobbi Dee Huxtable, SD, 84/75, $90; Manfred Berenbrinker, NE, 75/65, $60; Lynn M. Bachand, SD, 84/75, $90; Dennis Weinberger, Calgary, AB, 89/75, $200. Exceeding 36-55mph in urban Michael Christopher Nevans, MN, $112; Vincent Racalbuto, CA, $140.00. Superintendent's zone 25+mph Jon B. Jeffries, IN, $230.00. was in the making of zippers. Since a zipper is composed of two toothed tracks, attached to two fac- ing edges of fabric, and opened or closed by an attached slider between the tracks, it is ideal for use in mak- ing clothing. The fashion world soon took advantage of this, using zippers of all kinds in the clothing that was put on the market. Since the 1930s the use of zippers has become wide- spread. Many of the zippers in use today are made of nylon. These zippers can be made with large or small teeth and usually operate more smoothly that metal zippers. In 1948 another National Medal of Science was awarded for another device that now plays a large part in the making of certain kinds of cloth- ing as well as having other uses. That award went to de Mestral, a Swiss, for his discovery ofVelcro. Velcm re- lies on a series of nylon hooks that adhere to the surface of a special pile to hold things together. It is used extensively in shoes and other items for the use of people who have difficulty with other types of fasten- ers. Before the advent of the zipper, people had little choice of fasteners for clothes other than buttons, snaps and hooks. The zipper and other associated discoveries opened the way to a much wider range of fashions than had been possible before. Exceeding 26-44mph School Zone Matthew d. Brescia, CT, $108.00. Violation Rule or Reg Nightime Arnold L. Blackledge, Gillette, $210.00. Fail to stop dt Port of Entry Barry E. McCollam, OR, $I i0; Bobby A. Reece, Van Tassell, WY, $110.00. 395,8fi Log Book not Current Sherwood H. Gaunt, NJ, $160. Annual Reglstration/Veh Rickey E. Warren, MS, $60.00. Oper w/no permiss/permlt- night Leslie B. Kell, Winnipeg, MB, $21o.oo. 39S.3ai lO-Hour Violation Michael T. Brannon, AL, $160. Motor Carrier Safety Regs. Bernard Brusseau, SD, $160; Bernard Brusseau, SD, $160. Exhibition of Acceleration Guy C. Calonge, Gillette, $60. Trucks 84 in 7S Bartlomie J. Wozny, MI, $190 Operation/Towboats  >: Tom Hurley, Gillette, $60. 392.5 Alcohol Detected in Syst Kelly G. Hardisty, IA, $160. City Court Speeding Christine C. Flohr, Longrnont, CO, 40/30, $90; Melissa Holland, Se- attle, WA, 45/30, $120; Allen K. Fitzsimmons, Omaha, NE, 47/30, $128; Chad J. Slaney, Ft. Attdnson, WI, 28/20, $60; Dorothy Gaspersowich, Shohomish, WA, 27/ 20, $60; John A. Margrof, Sarasota, FL, 39/30, $96; Odean F. Olson, Rapid City r SD r 43/30 t $112.00. NOTICE e The regularly scheduled Thursday, October 17, 2002, school board meeting has been changed to: Tuesday, October 22, 2002 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. in Moorcroft at Moorcroft Secondary. Board of Trustees Crook County School Distdct Hal Bowles, Chairman Publish: October 17, 2002 IIAI00 for School Board lio'llBuiltlonlt Please take a minu/e to become aequaintad with one of the candidatea /of Crook CcceTly Boo/ Boa." Frank Harr has been a Crook County resident for over 10 years, residing in the Carllle area. He is married with three children. His wife, Melony, is a nurse, and is the Director of Frontier Home Health in Sundance. He is father to April and Justin, both Moorcroft High School graduates, and Moorcroft Elementary 6th grader, Cheyenne. Frank has been an active member of Moorcroft Chamber of Commerce. He has participated in Wyoming Business Council affairs, and has been a supportive member of the community. Frank built, opened and then operated the Moorcroft Subway for three years, where he employed numerous high-schoolers and became aware of their strengths, needs and weaknesses as employees. Frank Harr believes that not all graduates are meant to go on to college, but those that do should be educationally prepared. For those i who would like to choose a vocational occupation, there is a need to expose those students to the various careers available to them before they graduate. Your vote for FRANK HARR for Crook County School Board will be greatly appreciated. Paid for by Frank DID YOU KNOW? For every one of our 5887 men, women and children in Crook County: --The mineral industry mill levy pays $486.02 --The public utilities mill levy pays $53.97 per person --The Iocaly assessed property pays $239.96 per person One of the tasks of the Crook County Commissioners is to administer these tax dollars on your behalf. I am qualified to handle this position. PA TR I CIA A . FR OLANDER FOR COMMISSIONER Paid for by Patricia A. Frolander , FOR )CROOK C SHERI T November 5, 2002 Goals Restore stability in the Sheriff's Office through hiring and keeping good employees-- end turnover Re-establish working relations with other agencies: Local Police Departments Fire Department EMS State Law Enforcement Re-establish involvement with the youth of our community through interaction and education programs , , -Be a working Sheriff-- stay in touch with the citizkoCu/ :*Be a Shedff frkeQle- h- mograp y Experience Began Law Enforcement Career in Crook , Born tn Belie Fourche, 1961 County 1990 Grew up in Belle Fourche .=Detention Officer Certified =Associates Degree =Peace Officer Certified Wife Gabdel First Line Supervisor Trained =Son Grog, 21 =-Training Officer Certified =Crook County Resident since 1988 Over 1300 Hours of P.O.S.T Certified ' PAID FOR BY CITIZENS TO ELECT STEVE COUCH Seniority 8 yrs. Co. Commission 8 yrs. State Senate Stabilize Size of State Government Preserve Private Property Rights, Individuals' Freedom of Choice Fair Funding for Small Schools & Small Towns Increase Wyo. Water Storage & Utilization Improve & Expand State Transportation Served 8 yrs. Senate Agriculture & Natural Resource Committee, 7 yrs. Select Water, 4 yrs. Chairman Senate Transportation and Highways, ad-hoc State Forestry, & N.E. Wyo. Water Basin Advisory Committee. Re-elect Bill Barton State Senator Paid for by Bill Barton for State Senator Re-elect District 1 HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Including: Komatsu track dozer, 14E & 14 Cat motor graders, Case loader, 2-Ford backhoes, Ford loader, Cat rubber tired dozer, White Western star Dump truck IHC Cab over Semi, Fontain 48' Drop deck Trailer; Wilson straigth stock trailer, White dump truck; Langland 18' goose neck trailer; GMC stock truck, Ford dump truck and more. VEHICLES, AWe, TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT: 1986 Chevy & GMC 1 ton pickups w/ flatbeds, Ford F150 pickup; 3 Honda 300 & 250 Fourtrax four wheelers, Ford 800 Tractor, Kubota L-225 Diesel utility tractor, w/pto tiller, JD rotary mower, Lincoln Town Car, Ford 4x4 stepside pickup, Astro Mini van, Asst. farm machinery. 47-FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION The entire Dick Mader Collection: SHOTGUNS by Browning, Winchester, Remington, Sears, Coast To Coast, Springfield, Ithaca, Stevens, Mossberg, Glanfield, RIFLES by Remington, Ruger, Winchester, Savage, Marlin, Stevens, HANDGUNS by Ruger, Jennings, Raven, Smith & Wesson, Beretta, Davis, Tauler Military & Police, Luger, Walther, High Standard, Guemica Espania, Colt, and others Huge Supply of AMMUNITION AND ACC. BUILDINGS, SHEDS 8, TANKS: 26 Buildings & sheds to be removed from proparty, also propane & fuel tanks. FULL LINE OF TOOLS & SHOP ITEMS, HARDWARE, PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL, COLLECTABLE, HOUSEHOLD & MISC: Auctloneere Note: This is the last of three large auctions scheduled to market the vast holdings of long-time Campbell County resident, R.A. "Dick" Mader. We have certainly saved the best for last! Dick was a well known and respected Auctioneer, Real Estate Broker and Rancher in the region and collected many interesting and useful items. This is a partial listing only of literally thousands of items to be sold. Truly something here for everyone, plan to spend both enjoyable days with us on the beautiful Mader Ranch. We are honored the Mader family chose our firm to conduct Dick's Auctions. Sale Order: Words cannot dascdba the large quantity of property to be sold; you simply must see it to believe ill Selling Friday: Tools and shop items, Hardware, plumbing, electrical, collectibles and household, build[ and amino, heavy equipment, vehicle,, ill A,D _ www.bradeenauction.com R. A. "Dick" Mader Estate Kelly Mader, Peonal Representative 605-673-2629 GIIletta Wyoming i Ron Bradeen Broker/Auctioneer