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The Sundance Times
Sundance, Wyoming
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December 1, 1955     The Sundance Times
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December 1, 1955
 

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Methodist Folks Levi Louderback and fam- getting settled in the par- and invite you to call on at any time. Rev. Louder- extends a desire to share and problems so feel to come to him. to re-activate the M.Y.F. Underway. All the young peo- are invited to meet at 6:30 in the church next Sunday. will be something special You at that time. Chirstmas Cantata music is The choir meets every Tues- at 7 p.m. You people who like can help us immensely with project. You will enjoy it the whole community will like the Cantata. Methodist congregation ex- a vote of appreciation to the Guild for its kindness in its smorgasbord in of the W.S.C.S. Bazaar. We it and hope we can do for you someday. Dates to Remember Dec. 4: Sunday school, a.m.; Morning worship, 11 M.Y.F., 6:30 p.m. Dec. 7: W.S.C.S. meeting, 8 p.m., in church. Dec. 9: Christmas Ba- 3 p.m. throughout evening; dinner begins, 5:30 throughout the evening. Wyoming's Colodul Past By Bill Bragg, Jr. SIOUX, SHAN-TAG-A-LISK, and AHHO.AP.PA PART III after the Civil War, the government took imme- steps against hostile Indians of Fort Laramie in hopes of the bloody raids which occurring almost daily in region. So, the Powder Expedition in 1865 was or- and marched north into heart 'of the Sioux territory. the Expedition failed in its In fact, the entire oper- was considered lucky to have annhati0n. Then r the decided to try peace- means where force had failed. occurrence had taken place Laramie. early in the spring 1866 which was looked upon as omen for future relations the government and the This was the burial of daughter of Shan-tag- or Spotted Tail, Chief of the Sioux. Spotted Tail had ask- Colonel Maynadier, post com. at Fort Laramie if he bury his daughter near the she had requested that be buried near the white people she admired so greatly while alive. This was the favorite Chief Spotted Tail. Her Ah-ho-ap-ha, meant in the Brule Sioux language, wheat flour, the whitest thing an Indian could imagine. For several years prior to her death, she had come each summer to Fort Laramie with her father to trade, arid so the story goes, had come to admire the white people. She especially liked to watch the soldiers on parade. In fact, in order to impress her when she was watching the soldiers, the post commander, Major Wood, had ask- the officer-of-the-guard to appear in full dress uniform. Thereafter, for the daughter of a great Sioux chief, the officer-of-the-guard ap- peared in, "an eighteen-dollar red silk sash, ostrich plume, shoulder- straps, and about two hundred dol- lars worth of astonishing raiment" While most men abhorred this sort of dress on the frontier due to the really great beauty of Ah-ho-ap-ha, it has been reported that no grum- ble was heard from the officer-of- the-guard bechause he had to show himself off to lovely Ah-ho-ap-ha. The Sioux princess, it was re- ported, had fallen in love with not only the white people, but also an officer who, sad to relate, was a married man. After leaving the old fort one fall with her father and the Brule Sioux, Ah-ho-ap-ha fell ill in the winter of 1865-1866. She never recovered from this ill- ness, and her last request before she died in the Powder River Coun- try was to be buried near the mighty white people. So, her father, Chief Spotted Tail had her wrapped in smoked deerskin and tied her body to the backs of two white ponies which were in turn, tied side-by-side. Approaching Fort Laramie, Chief Spotted Taft re- quested permission from the post commander to follow his daugh- ter's last wish. In as fine a demonstration of diplomacy as has been recorded in U. S. Military history, Colonel May. nadier gave Ah-ho-ap-ha a beauti- ful funeral and buriel. First, he sent a military ambulance to meet the sad procession bearing the body of Old Spot's daughter. The am-' bulance was guarded by a calvary company, resplendent in full dress uniform. The ambulance, with the girl's body in it was followed by two twelve-pound howitzers decor- ated with red ribbon. Then the Colonel and his staff met Chief Spotted Tail and his entourage and escorted them to Fort Laramie. A coffin was built and a scaffold was erected upon which the coffin was to repose after the manner in which many Plains Indians buried their dead. Mounted upon a mili- tary caisson, the coffin was taken from the fort at dusk to the cem- etery with an honor guard from the 0rt, the Colonel and his staff, and "the relatives of Ah-ho-ap-ha following. The post chaplin, Rev- erend Wright, conducted the serv- ice using a little red book, "an Turkey Shoot Hulett, Wyo. Sunday, December 4 One mile north in Bill Bush's field 22's & I00igh-Powered Rifles ,Open Sights and Scopes $1.00 per shot COFFEE AT ALL TIMES 15 Turkeys Sponsored by the Devils FFA Chapter Tower THE SUNDANCE TIMES Sundauce, Wyo. Dec. 1, 1955 episcopal prayer book which Gen- eral Harney had given her mother, a book which Ah-ho-ap-ha had car- ried all her life." After the funeral offerings had been given, Colonel Maynadier parting with a pair of valued white kid cavalry gloves, the coffin was raised to the scaffold and covered with a buffalo robe. Securing the coffin down tight with leather thongs, an honor guard was main- tained at the cemetery and fired a muffled howitzer at half-hour in- tervals throughout the night. Na- turally, Chief Spotted Tail and his war chiefs were thoroughly im- pressed and highly honored by the elegant display of military honor accorded Ah-ho-ap-ha, a display which they had, not counted on. The next morning, Colonel May- nadier told Chief Spotted Tail of the idea of peaceful means which the government was considering in trying to bring tb a close the raids and battles being carried on between red and white men at that time. The wise Colonel ended his conference with the Brule Chief with these words after pointing to an American flag hanging on the wall of his office: "My Indian Brother, look at those stripes. Some of them are red, and some of them are white. They remain peacefully side by side -- the red and the white -- for there is room for each." There is good reason to believe that Colonel Maynadier's actions at Fort Laramie were to bear fruit because Spotted Tail was not known to lead his Brule Sioux into battles which were to follow during the coming fall and winter of 1866 -- The Fetterman Massacre -- or the following year, 1867 at the famed Wagon Box Fight. In fact, it is rare to find where Spotted Tail's Brule Sioux ever fought against the government troops or civilians, for that matter, after the burial of Ah-ho-ap-ha at Fort Lara- mie in 1866. l ersonal Items Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lockwood and Mr. and Mrs. Red Carpenter of Midwest were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Cole and Susie Sunday and Monday while hunting in the Sundance area. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Harvey and Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Cole were busi- ness callers in Spearfish Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Semsey and John Driver were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Bud Miller and Gary. Mrs. J. D. Plato took her son Charles to Osage Sunday evening to catch a bus to Denver where Charles is attendin school. Vernon Wells of-Seely was a caller at the Wilford Collins home Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Merle Blakeman and family of Sheridan were huse guests Thursday to Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Blakeman and fam- ily. On Saturday Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Dennis and family of New Haven were also guests at the Blakeman home. The Junior Class of Sundance High School presents "T is h" A Comedy .... .... 1:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 6 In The Gymnasium Adults - 75c Grades 7-12 - 35c Grades - 25c Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French. Ford's new , hunderbird Y-8 engine brings you lower that obeys your commands instantly] Nothing can beat the driving fun of Ford's new Thunderbird Y-8*. You'll pass with new ease and confidence. Hills will melt. And its deep-block design means a smoother, longed-lived engine. *It's the standard eight for Fairlane and Station Wagon models. Ford's Thunderbird lines turn heads wherever you g0! You'll see why Ford and the famous Thunderbird are called kissin' cousins. For here's all the dash and dazzle of the Thunderbird in family size! Its clean-cut styling will stay ahead in the years ahead. Ford's the fine car at half the fine-car price !  , ' In Ford you'll fld new Lifeguard Design. But that's only the beginning. Come in. You'll agree that everything in the new '56 Ford says "fine car" F.O.A.F. except the price! STOCKMEN'S MOTOR CO. Gillette, Wyo. Methodist Folks Levi Louderback and fam- getting settled in the par- and invite you to call on at any time. Rev. Louder- extends a desire to share and problems so feel to come to him. to re-activate the M.Y.F. Underway. All the young peo- are invited to meet at 6:30 in the church next Sunday. will be something special You at that time. Chirstmas Cantata music is The choir meets every Tues- at 7 p.m. You people who like can help us immensely with project. You will enjoy it the whole community will like the Cantata. Methodist congregation ex- a vote of appreciation to the Guild for its kindness in its smorgasbord in of the W.S.C.S. Bazaar. We it and hope we can do for you someday. Dates to Remember Dec. 4: Sunday school, a.m.; Morning worship, 11 M.Y.F., 6:30 p.m. Dec. 7: W.S.C.S. meeting, 8 p.m., in church. Dec. 9: Christmas Ba- 3 p.m. throughout evening; dinner begins, 5:30 throughout the evening. Wyoming's Colodul Past By Bill Bragg, Jr. SIOUX, SHAN-TAG-A-LISK, and AHHO.AP.PA PART III after the Civil War, the government took imme- steps against hostile Indians of Fort Laramie in hopes of the bloody raids which occurring almost daily in region. So, the Powder Expedition in 1865 was or- and marched north into heart 'of the Sioux territory. the Expedition failed in its In fact, the entire oper- was considered lucky to have annhati0n. Then r the decided to try peace- means where force had failed. occurrence had taken place Laramie. early in the spring 1866 which was looked upon as omen for future relations the government and the This was the burial of daughter of Shan-tag- or Spotted Tail, Chief of the Sioux. Spotted Tail had ask- Colonel Maynadier, post com. at Fort Laramie if he bury his daughter near the she had requested that be buried near the white people she admired so greatly while alive. This was the favorite Chief Spotted Tail. Her Ah-ho-ap-ha, meant in the Brule Sioux language, wheat flour, the whitest thing an Indian could imagine. For several years prior to her death, she had come each summer to Fort Laramie with her father to trade, arid so the story goes, had come to admire the white people. She especially liked to watch the soldiers on parade. In fact, in order to impress her when she was watching the soldiers, the post commander, Major Wood, had ask- the officer-of-the-guard to appear in full dress uniform. Thereafter, for the daughter of a great Sioux chief, the officer-of-the-guard ap- peared in, "an eighteen-dollar red silk sash, ostrich plume, shoulder- straps, and about two hundred dol- lars worth of astonishing raiment" While most men abhorred this sort of dress on the frontier due to the really great beauty of Ah-ho-ap-ha, it has been reported that no grum- ble was heard from the officer-of- the-guard bechause he had to show himself off to lovely Ah-ho-ap-ha. The Sioux princess, it was re- ported, had fallen in love with not only the white people, but also an officer who, sad to relate, was a married man. After leaving the old fort one fall with her father and the Brule Sioux, Ah-ho-ap-ha fell ill in the winter of 1865-1866. She never recovered from this ill- ness, and her last request before she died in the Powder River Coun- try was to be buried near the mighty white people. So, her father, Chief Spotted Tail had her wrapped in smoked deerskin and tied her body to the backs of two white ponies which were in turn, tied side-by-side. Approaching Fort Laramie, Chief Spotted Taft re- quested permission from the post commander to follow his daugh- ter's last wish. In as fine a demonstration of diplomacy as has been recorded in U. S. Military history, Colonel May. nadier gave Ah-ho-ap-ha a beauti- ful funeral and buriel. First, he sent a military ambulance to meet the sad procession bearing the body of Old Spot's daughter. The am-' bulance was guarded by a calvary company, resplendent in full dress uniform. The ambulance, with the girl's body in it was followed by two twelve-pound howitzers decor- ated with red ribbon. Then the Colonel and his staff met Chief Spotted Tail and his entourage and escorted them to Fort Laramie. A coffin was built and a scaffold was erected upon which the coffin was to repose after the manner in which many Plains Indians buried their dead. Mounted upon a mili- tary caisson, the coffin was taken from the fort at dusk to the cem- etery with an honor guard from the 0rt, the Colonel and his staff, and "the relatives of Ah-ho-ap-ha following. The post chaplin, Rev- erend Wright, conducted the serv- ice using a little red book, "an Turkey Shoot Hulett, Wyo. Sunday, December 4 One mile north in Bill Bush's field 22's & I00igh-Powered Rifles ,Open Sights and Scopes $1.00 per shot COFFEE AT ALL TIMES 15 Turkeys Sponsored by the Devils FFA Chapter Tower THE SUNDANCE TIMES Sundauce, Wyo. Dec. 1, 1955 episcopal prayer book which Gen- eral Harney had given her mother, a book which Ah-ho-ap-ha had car- ried all her life." After the funeral offerings had been given, Colonel Maynadier parting with a pair of valued white kid cavalry gloves, the coffin was raised to the scaffold and covered with a buffalo robe. Securing the coffin down tight with leather thongs, an honor guard was main- tained at the cemetery and fired a muffled howitzer at half-hour in- tervals throughout the night. Na- turally, Chief Spotted Tail and his war chiefs were thoroughly im- pressed and highly honored by the elegant display of military honor accorded Ah-ho-ap-ha, a display which they had, not counted on. The next morning, Colonel May- nadier told Chief Spotted Tail of the idea of peaceful means which the government was considering in trying to bring tb a close the raids and battles being carried on between red and white men at that time. The wise Colonel ended his conference with the Brule Chief with these words after pointing to an American flag hanging on the wall of his office: "My Indian Brother, look at those stripes. Some of them are red, and some of them are white. They remain peacefully side by side -- the red and the white -- for there is room for each." There is good reason to believe that Colonel Maynadier's actions at Fort Laramie were to bear fruit because Spotted Tail was not known to lead his Brule Sioux into battles which were to follow during the coming fall and winter of 1866 -- The Fetterman Massacre -- or the following year, 1867 at the famed Wagon Box Fight. In fact, it is rare to find where Spotted Tail's Brule Sioux ever fought against the government troops or civilians, for that matter, after the burial of Ah-ho-ap-ha at Fort Lara- mie in 1866. l ersonal Items Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lockwood and Mr. and Mrs. Red Carpenter of Midwest were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Cole and Susie Sunday and Monday while hunting in the Sundance area. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Harvey and Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Cole were busi- ness callers in Spearfish Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Semsey and John Driver were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Bud Miller and Gary. Mrs. J. D. Plato took her son Charles to Osage Sunday evening to catch a bus to Denver where Charles is attendin school. Vernon Wells of-Seely was a caller at the Wilford Collins home Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Merle Blakeman and family of Sheridan were huse guests Thursday to Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Blakeman and fam- ily. On Saturday Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Dennis and family of New Haven were also guests at the Blakeman home. The Junior Class of Sundance High School presents "T is h" A Comedy .... .... 1:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 6 In The Gymnasium Adults - 75c Grades 7-12 - 35c Grades - 25c Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French. Ford's new , hunderbird Y-8 engine brings you lower that obeys your commands instantly] Nothing can beat the driving fun of Ford's new Thunderbird Y-8*. You'll pass with new ease and confidence. Hills will melt. And its deep-block design means a smoother, longed-lived engine. *It's the standard eight for Fairlane and Station Wagon models. Ford's Thunderbird lines turn heads wherever you g0! You'll see why Ford and the famous Thunderbird are called kissin' cousins. For here's all the dash and dazzle of the Thunderbird in family size! Its clean-cut styling will stay ahead in the years ahead. Ford's the fine car at half the fine-car price !  , ' In Ford you'll fld new Lifeguard Design. But that's only the beginning. Come in. You'll agree that everything in the new '56 Ford says "fine car" F.O.A.F. except the price! STOCKMEN'S MOTOR CO. Gillette, Wyo.